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Tips For Low-Carb Diet Beginners +A Printable Week One Keto/Low Carb 7 Day Meal Plan & Progress-Diet Program

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HOW TO START A LOW CARB DIET

There is a handy infographic at the end of this post that will help you get started.

It may seem daunting how to start changing you and your families way of eating. It doesn’t have to be. Just start little by little. Every change you make, gets you a step closer to being healthier.

Think of it like a scale of what’s best and what’s not. At one end you have fried, processed carbs, cakes, sweets, ice cream. At the other end, very little carbs, whole foods, and no packaged goods.

Don’t think it is impossible. Just do the best you can and each step is a step closer. Every step you can take to reduce your carbohydrate consumption is fantastic.

At one end you have fried, processed carbs, cakes, sweets, ice cream. At the other end, very little carbs, whole foods, and no packaged goods. Don’t think it is impossible.

Just do the best you can and each step is a step closer. Every step you can take to reduce your carbohydrate consumption is fantastic. If you eat 3 meals a day and maybe 3 snacks, that equates to 42 opportunities (or food choices) to improve.

How about you start by just changing your snacks to begin with. Already you have improved 21 of your food choices each week. You’re halfway there.

Once your comfortable with this, now improve your breakfast. Now you have improved 28 out of 42. Next your dinner, and then your lunch. This is sometimes the hardest as so many eat out at lunch.

Each meal you have which is a good choice, is one less bad meal. Ditch the processed carbs!

These are the first 5 things you should stop to cut our sugar and carbs from your diet: Take a look at my post onLow Carb Hacks where you can easily see how to make better choices and low carb swaps.

  1. Fizzy drinks, fruit juice, flavoured milk and energy drinks – liquid sugar in a bottle. Even the fruit juice and flavoured milk.
  2. Sweets, confectionary, sugary treats – and don’t be fooled but the ones that market themselves as being made with real fruit juice. They are still little cubes of sugar but packed into an attractive sweet.
  3. Baking, cakes, biscuits, pastries – all incredibly high in sugar, wheat, carbs and bad fats.
  4. Cereals – especially the wholegrain ones. Highly processed, high in sugar and fortified. It will make you have a low sugar crash later in the morning and not fulfil you.
  5. Sugar & Flour – if you give up these 2 things, you will improve your health, weight and nutrition beyond belief. People may say it is restrictive and you are giving up entire food groups, but what you are giving up is food products. It is only because flour and sugar are made into so many products that it appears to be restrictive. Even just 10 years ago, these products weren’t available. Supermarkets looked very different to how they do now.

SO WHAT CAN YOU EAT?

Take a look at the Low Carb Starter Pack which has 25 easy recipes for beginners, meal plan, shopping list, a progress tracker and simple guides.

  • Meat – all types of beef, pork, chicken, lamb etc. Do not trim the fat or the skin off the chicken – yay –
  • Fish – all types especially those high in Omega 3 such as salmon, mussels, tuna, sardines …
  • Chicken – skin on, free range
  • Vegetables – all types that grown above the ground. Leafy greens, spinach, silver beet, broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage, avocados, courgettes, aubergines, capsicums, mushrooms, lettuce …..
  • Cheese – choose the full fat varieties.
  • Cream – full fat, double, whipping.
  • Full fat milk – avoid all flavored milks and avoid any milk in large quantities because even though it may only contain 5% carbs, it is easy to drink a 250ml serving which equates to 12.5g carbs.
  • Nuts and seeds – a great snack but just watch not to overindulge, especially on cashews which have a higher carb content and many nuts are high in omega 6 and we need to watch our 3/6 ration.
  • Eggs – choose free range if you can
  • Fruit – best to eat the low carb, nutrient dense berries such as blueberries, blackberries etc. Serve with double cream to ensure you are satiated for longer.
  • Fats – use butter, olive oil, coconut oil (high in oleic acid), lard

WHAT TO AVOID?

  • All processed sugar drinks – this includes fizzy drinks, flavoured milks, sports drinks, energy drinks and especially fruit juices which are incredibly high in carbs.
  • All cakes, biscuits, jams, sweets.
  • Seed Oils  stop using any seed oils such as sunflower, canola, corn, grapes or margarines. They are all high in inflammatory Omega 6
  • All cereals – if you look at most cereal packets, they contain anywhere from 50%-80% carbs. No wonder they are known as CEREAL KILLERS!!!
  • Bread, pasta, potatoes, sugar etc. There is no nutritional value in these foods. You may argue that there is fibre and B group vitamins, true, but you by gain so much more fibre and vitamins by increasing your vegetable intake and stopping the leaky gut that wheat creates which also reduces your vitamin/nutrient absorption. There is no known bread or pasta deficiency in medicine!
  • Fruit is something that should be limited because of the high fructose content. It is natures candy. Yes fruit has vitamins and healthy nutrients, but you will be getting far more nutrients from your increase veggie intake. Choose nutrient dense, low carb fruits such as berries. Fruit such as pineapple, mango, and especially dried fruits, should be avoided. Also avoid ALL fruit juices. They have an incredibly high glycaemic index, which will make your insulin spike (and start storing fat again). “If you are overweight, fruit is not your friend”.
  • All wheat products have a high GI, raise your blood sugar and increase appetite
  • Grains avoid all grains including wheat, oats, barley, spelt, sorghum
  • Pasta  high in carbohydrates and almost no nutritional value
  • Potatoes as above
  • Starchy vegetables if you can tolerate some carbs, choose highly coloured starchy vegetables such as pumpkin, carrots, beetroot or sweet potato for their wonderful phytonutrients and vitamins.
  • Rice very little nutritional value. Generally used to bulk out a meal. Try substituting rice for more vegetables.
  • Rice crackers these are almost 80% carbs and incredibly processed, especially the flavored ones. Avoid.
  • Diet or low fat products check the labels and you will see how processed they are and how much higher in carbs they are compared to their regular version e.g, low fat cream cheese can be up to 15% carbs, whereas the regular is only4%

SOMETIMES FOODS

If you don’t have weight to lose, are metabolically healthy and all your blood results are within your goal, you can occasionally have the following.

  • Red wine not sweet varieties
  • Dark chocolate 85% or above
  • Low carb baking part of the ethos of going low carb is to give up the sweet treats, but when the need arises, best to make it a low carb recipe

WEEKLY MEAL PLANNER

How many carbs you consume depends on your health goals. Your daily carb allowance will be different for someone who is weight stable, diabetic, or someone who has a lot of weight to lose. Personally I don’t count anything anymore as I know all the foods I choose are low carb, sugar free, grain free and my appetite is well regulated.

All the nutrition panels in my recipes are guides only. There are so many variables with different brands that you choose so if your carb requirement is strict, please calculate your own for accuracy.

From the examples below, you can choose your own weekly meal plan. It will take some time to adjust your appetite, but believe me, it will change. In the meantime, if you are hungry, increase your healthy fats at each meal.

It really will keep you fuller for longer, but to do this, you MUST decrease your carbs (otherwise your diet is nothing more than a standard high carb high fat diet). So pour more healthy oils onto your salad, snack on nuts, coconut cream etc. Click here for my list of top snack foods.

BREAKFAST Grain Free Cinnamon Crunch. This is a fabulous and healthy alternative to sugar laden cereals. Make a big batch every few weeks and enjoy it with milk, berries or yoghurt. | ditchthecarbs.com

Choose 1 – Click here for all breakfast recipes

LUNCH 

Crustless Bacon & Egg pie. An incredibly easy recipe which is grain free, gluten free, wheat free and low carb. | ditchthecarbs.com

Choose 1 – Click here for all lunch recipes

  • last nights leftovers are KING!
  • salad with any combination of lettuce, spinach, avocado, tuna, salmon, chicken, bacon, egg, olives, tomatoes, feta, capsicums, spring onion, beetroot, etc and add oil, full fat (not lite) mayonnaise
  • crustless bacon and egg pie
  • salmon crustless quiche
  • rice free sushi
  • salmon zoodles
  • my children regularly make themselves smoothies, bacon (2 minutes in the microwave covered with kitchen paper), scrambled eggs with cheese in the microwave (mix 2 eggs, cheese, milk – 1 minute, stir, 30 seconds, stir, 30 seconds, stir). They used to moan and complain there are no cereals in the house, but they have learned to cook their own breakfasts and look for what ingredients we have rather than reach for a box of cornflakes
  • easy egg salad

DINNERS 

Slow Cooker Malaysian Beef Curry | ditchthecarbs.com

  • good quality meat and plenty of low starch vegetables. Add fat in the form of butter or cream cheese on the table for encouraging children to eat their vegetables. Add stilton onto steaks, grated cheese onto broccoli, hollandaise sauce, cream sauces.
  • try and make your regular recipes to start but remove the carbs, so a stir fry and remove the rice and add a double helping of vegetables to the mix. Make meatballs and zoodles. Roast dinner but without the potatoes. Lasagne but use zucchini slices instead of lasagne sheets.
  • Fish, fish, fish. The oilier the better to increase your omega 3 and essential fatty acids for brain power, such assalmon, tuna, mackerel, sardines.
  • Chicken tenderloins wrapped in bacon with a cream cheese sauce
  • Burgers – homemade and no bun. Add salad, avocado, cheese, grated carrot, mushrooms, ….

SNACKSHealthy Sugar Free Snacks | ditchthecarbs.com

Click here for all snack recipes

  • I dont tend to snack much these days, but if I do I make a snack tray for the children
  • most days I have a decaffeinated coffee made with full fat milk and added cream. This usually fills me up and I don’t need much more although it did take quite a long time before snacking wasn’t part of my day
  • cubes of cheese
  • small handful of nuts (not cashews)
  • coconut cream in the fridge goes quite firm so you can eat a spoon or two to keep hunger at bay (or add cocoa powder and stevia for a chocolate fix)
  • very dark chocolate – the higher % the better as you won’t want more than 2 squares and it is actually good for you
  • a boiled egg
  • cheese or pate on cucumber slices instead of crackers
  • cheese and olives

Don’t worry if you have a bad meal or a bad day. Congratulate yourself on how you have improved, from when you started and probably all of your 42 food choices a week were so unhealthy. As you continue, you will feel so much better from eating low carb, you wont want little slip ups any more.

“STRIVE FOR IMPROVEMENT, NOT PERFECTION”

I didn’t go through my pantry and throw away all my high carb foods, I just used them up slowly, then didn’t replace them. My bread maker, toaster and bread bin are all gone.

That was a great day. I got to the point where I hadn’t bought bread in over 2 months, so decided this was the day. Wow, how much better your kitchen bench looks!

Start by thinking of your regular meals and just think about how you can cut the carbs out. Have a roast dinner but cut out the potatoes and root vegetables but have as many other vegetables as you like. Instead of crumbed fish and chips, have grilled salmon on salad with a lemon dressing.

Have a hamburger but not the bread bun, load it up with veggies and cheese. Instead of a sandwich, have the fillings on a salad or wrapped in a nori (seaweed) sheet, wrapped in slices of ham or other deli meats. And instead of cheesecake with biscuit base and sugar laden filling, have a base made of ground almonds topped with cream, cream cheese and berry filling.

Start to google low carb recipes, submit your own to me and I can add them here. It’s amazing how you can tweak your old favourites to remove the carbs and add more vegetables, fat and dressings. Your diet will be more meat and plant based and far less processed than before.

Photo credit to Dr Ted Naiman MD Check out his website BurnFatNotSugar.comThe low carb food pyramid which is based on real food, healthy oils and good quality protein. | ditchthecarbs.com

Week One Keto/Low Carb 7 Day Meal Plan & Progress

OK, can I just be honest and say that this 7 day keto menu plan thingy is a lot harder than I thought it would be????  (If you have no idea what I’m talking about, you can get caught up by reading the 3 day keto kickstart post.)  I’m sure it’s just my inexperience, and it will get easier after the learning curve, but keeping the carbs below 20g, making it budget friendly, not too much time spent cooking, finding ways to repurpose leftovers, etc. takes time!

This first version will be in list format, because I just didn’t have time yet to figure out other options. In the future it will either be in table format with links, in a downloadable pdf, something more user friendly than this. But this is what I’ve got this week, since I only had 2 days to figure it out so far!

If you want to print it I suggest cutting and pasting into a word document for now. Future low carb menu plans will hopefully be more user friendly (and will be posted every Saturday.)

I kept the calories around 1600 per day give or take, and the carbs below 20g (obviously). I also posted daily nutrition totals, and also nutrition info for each item. That way, if you need to make substitutions you can figure out how it will affect your daily stats, and still keep it under 20g net carbs. You may find that you don’t need nearly as much food as this plan calls for – adjust portions and snacks to meet your own needs.

Speaking of substitutions it’s time for some tough love. Hate avocados? Substitute almonds. Allergic to nuts? Eat string cheese. Whether you use these menu plans as a general guideline or follow them to the letter (or not at all), that’s completely up to you.

PLEASE do not email me asking me how many carbs it would add to your day if you substitute one snack or meal from another day on the plan. That’s why I took the time to put the nutrition info on each item, so you can figure that out on your own. You may have to do some math for your own substitutions – don’t ask me to do it for you or I will get cranky.

 

There are literally thousands of you, each with your own personal dietary, time, and budget requirements, so it’s just not possible for me to make the perfect menu for your ideal circumstances each week.  I’m doing my best to make the menu plans easy to follow, not break the bank time or money-wise, and hopefully be delicious and satisfying – so please try to be flexible and reasonable with your expectations each week.

For example, if you hate cauliflower, please don’t email me to ask me if I have any other suggestions for you on that particular day. Ain’t nobody (specifically me) got time for that. I don’t mean to sound harsh, but I just can’t hold your hand through every single decision you’ll need to make on what to eat each day. I have a hard enough time managing my own!

And for the love of all that is decent, NEVER, EVER email me telling me that your keto calculator says that you need to eat 141.7 calories and 9.2g fat more than my menu for the day calls for – and then ask me what you should eat! I CANNOT BE HELD RESPONSIBLE FOR THE SNARKY RESPONSE THAT WILL PROBABLY SHOW UP IN YOUR INBOX AS A RESULT.  (I don’t like it when my voice sounds like this.)  🙅 😡 🙊

It’s time to educate yourself and put yer thinking caps on if you haven’t already. I very much want you to succeed (really I do!) and I’m here to help, but there’s a limit to how much time I can spend on this.  That being said, if you have legitimate questions, requests, or suggestions for future menu plans (too much variety/cooking, not enough? etc.) and how to improve them – please DO feel free to leave them in the comments!  And if you spot an error somewhere please do let me know so I can fix it!!!!

Also in the comments, please keep us posted each week as to how you are doing – feeling great? Miserable? Lost a ton of weight? None? WE WANT TO HEAR ABOUT IT! I’m hoping that we can congratulate or console each other on our amazing progress (or lack thereof) each week. In fact I’m really looking forward to that part!!!

Finally, as a reminder, if you haven’t gotten your ketostix yet, you should order some or run out to your Walmart or Pharmacy – they aren’t expensive and it’s nice to have validation that you are in ketosis once you get started!

Ok, next I’m posting the menu plan, below that you will find a shopping list, and finally notes on suggested prep.

Week One 7 Day Keto Menu Plan

Day One

(Totals: 1650 calories, 132g fat, 14g net carbs, 88g protein)

Breakfast:

3 inch square, Sausage & Spinach Frittata (206 calories, 16g fat, 1g net carbs, 12g protein)
Coffee with 2 Tbsp Heavy Cream (120 calories, 12g fat, 1g net carbs, 0g protein)

Snack

1/2 hass avocado w/ lite salt and pepper (114 calories, 11g fat, 1 g net carbs, 1g protein)

Lunch

1/2 cup Simple Egg Salad (166 calories, 14g fat, 1g net carbs, 10g protein)
4 Romaine Lettuce Leaves (4 calories, 0g fat, 0g net carbs, 0g protein)
2 slices cooked bacon (92 calories, 7g fat, 0g net carbs, 6g protein)

 

Keto Egg Salad from Mellissa Sevigny at I Breathe I'm Hungry

Snack

24 raw almonds (166 calories, 15g fat, 2g net carbs, 6g protein)

Dinner

6 oz rotisserie chicken (276 calories, 11g fat, 0g net carbs, 42g protein)
3/4 cup Easy Cauliflower Gratin (215 calories, 19g fat, 2g net carbs, 6g protein)
2 cups chopped romaine lettuce (16 calories, 0g fat, 1g net carbs, 1g protein)
2 Tbsp Caesar Salad Dressing (sugar free) (170 calories, 18g fat, 2g net carbs, 1g protein)

low carb cauliflower gratin

Dessert

2 squares Lindt 90% Chocolate (105 calories, 9g fat, 3g net carbs, 3g protein)

Day Two

(Totals: 1636 calories, 126g fat, 18.5g net carbs, 88g protein)

Breakfast:

3 inch square, Sausage & Spinach Frittata (206 calories, 16g fat, 1g net carbs, 12g protein)
Coffee with 2 Tbsp Heavy Cream (120 calories, 12g fat, 1g net carbs, 0g protein)

Snack

5 sticks of celery with 2 Tbsp Almond Butter (200 calories, 16g fat, 2.5g net carbs, 7g protein)

Lunch

2 cups chopped romaine lettuce (16 calories, 0g fat, 1g net carbs, 1g protein)
2 Tbsp Caesar Salad Dressing (sugar free) (170 calories, 18g fat, 2g net carbs, 1g protein)
1 cup chopped leftover chicken (276 calories, 11g fat, 0g net carbs, 42g protein)

Snack

1/2 hass avocado w/ lite salt and pepper (114 calories, 11g fat, 1 g net carbs, 1g protein)

Dinner

1 italian sausage link, cooked and sliced (230 calories, 18g fat, 1g net carbs, 13g protein)
1 cup cooked broccoli (55 calories, 0g fat, 6g net carbs, 4g protein)
1 Tbsp butter (102 calories, 12g fat, 0g net carbs, 0g protein)
2 Tbsp grated parmesan cheese (42 calories, 3g fat, 0g net carbs, 4g protein)

Dessert

2 squares Lindt 90% Chocolate (105 calories, 9g fat, 3g net carbs, 3g protein)

Day Three

(Totals: 1512 calories, 119g fat, 18g net carbs, 78g protein)

Breakfast:

2 Cream Cheese Pancakes (172 calories, 14g fat, 1g net carbs, 8g protein)
2 pcs cooked bacon (92 calories, 7g fat, 0g net carbs, 6g protein)
Coffee with 2 Tbsp Heavy Cream (120 calories, 12g fat, 1g net carbs, 0g protein)

Snack

2 String Cheese (160 calories, 12g fat, 2g net carbs, 16g protein)

Lunch

1 italian sausage link, cooked and sliced (230 calories, 18g fat, 1g net carbs, 13g protein)
3/4 cup Easy Cauliflower Gratin (215 calories, 19g fat, 2g net carbs, 6g protein)

Snack

1 cup bone broth (50 calories, 1g fat, 0g net carbs, 1g protein)

Dinner

1 1/2 cup Chili Spaghetti Squash Casserole (284 calories, 20g fat, 6g net carbs, 23g protein)
2 cups raw baby spinach (14 calories, 0g fat, 1g net carbs, 2g protein)
1 Tbsp ranch dressing (sugar free) (70 calories, 7g fat, 1g net carbs, 0g protein)

low carb and gluten free casserole recipe from ibreatheimhungry.com

Dessert

2 squares Lindt 90% Chocolate (105 calories, 9g fat, 3g net carbs, 3g protein)

Day Four

(Totals: 1386 calories, 112g fat, 19.5g net carbs, 69g protein)

Breakfast:

3 inch square, Sausage & Spinach Frittata (206 calories, 16g fat, 1g net carbs, 12g protein)
Coffee with 2 Tbsp Heavy Cream (120 calories, 12g fat, 1g net carbs, 0g protein)

Snack

1/2 hass avocado w/ lite salt and pepper (114 calories, 11g fat, 1 g net carbs, 1g protein)

Lunch

1 1/2 cup Chili Spaghetti Squash Casserole (284 calories, 20g fat, 6g net carbs, 23g protein)

Snack

1 cup bone broth (50 calories, 1g fat, 0g net carbs, 1g protein)

Dinner

1/2 cup “Anti” Pasta Salad (102 calories, 8g fat, 4g net carbs, 3g protein)
4 Sundried Tomato & Feta Meatballs (356 calories, 32g fat, 2.5g net carbs, 24g protein)
2 cups raw baby spinach (14 calories, 0g fat, 1g net carbs, 2g protein)
1 Tbsp italian dressing (sugar free) (35 calories, 3g fat, 0g net carbs, 0g protein)

 

Sun dried Tomato & Feta Meatballs

Dessert

2 squares Lindt 90% Chocolate (105 calories, 9g fat, 3g net carbs, 3g protein)

Day Five

(Totals: 1649 calories, 132g fat, 18.5g net carbs, 81g protein)

Breakfast:

2 Cream Cheese Pancakes (172 calories, 14g fat, 1g net carbs, 8g protein)
2 pcs cooked bacon (92 calories, 7g fat, 0g net carbs, 6g protein)
Coffee with 2 Tbsp Heavy Cream (120 calories, 12g fat, 1g net carbs, 0g protein)

Snack

1 cup bone broth (50 calories, 1g fat, 0g net carbs, 1g protein)

Lunch

1/2 cup “Anti” Pasta Salad (102 calories, 8g fat, 4g net carbs, 3g protein)
4 Sundried Tomato & Feta Meatballs (356 calories, 32g fat, 2.5g net carbs, 24g protein)

pastalesssalad2small

Snack

5 sticks of celery with 2 Tbsp Almond Butter (200 calories, 16g fat, 2.5g net carbs, 7g protein)

Dinner

1 cup Cuban Pot Roast (taco salad style) (271 calories, 19g fat, 2g net carbs, 20g protein)
2 cups chopped romaine lettuce (16 calories, 0g fat, 1g net carbs, 1g protein)
2 Tbsp sour cream (51 calories, 5g fat, 1g net carbs, 1g protein)
1 Tbsp chopped cilantro (optional)
1/4 cup shredded cheddar cheese (114 calories, 9g fat, .5g net carbs, 7g protein)

Dessert

2 squares Lindt 90% Chocolate (105 calories, 9g fat, 3g net carbs, 3g protein)

Day Six

(Totals: 1604 calories, 122g fat, 19.5g net carbs, 89g protein)

Breakfast:

3 eggs (scrambled or fried) (215 calories, 14g fat, 1g net carbs, 19g protein)
1 tsp butter (36 calories, 4g fat, 0g net carbs, 0g protein)
2 pcs cooked bacon (92 calories, 7g fat, 0g net carbs, 6g protein)
Coffee with 2 Tbsp Heavy Cream (120 calories, 12g fat, 1g net carbs, 0g protein)

Snack

24 raw almonds (166 calories, 15g fat, 2g net carbs, 6g protein)

Lunch

1 cup Cuban Pot Roast (taco salad style) (271 calories, 19g fat, 2g net carbs, 20g protein)
2 cups chopped romaine lettuce (16 calories, 0g fat, 1g net carbs, 1g protein)
2 Tbsp sour cream (51 calories, 5g fat, 1g net carbs, 1g protein)
1 Tbsp chopped cilantro (optional)
1/4 cup shredded cheddar cheese (114 calories, 9g fat, .5g net carbs, 7g protein)

low carb ropa vieja recipe from ibreatheimhungry.com

Snack

1 cup bone broth (50 calories, 1g fat, 0g net carbs, 1g protein)

Dinner

1 1/2 cup Chili Spaghetti Squash Casserole (284 calories, 20g fat, 6g net carbs, 23g protein)
2 cups raw baby spinach (14 calories, 0g fat, 1g net carbs, 2g protein)
1 Tbsp ranch dressing (sugar free) (70 calories, 7g fat, 1g net carbs, 0g protein)

Dessert

2 squares Lindt 90% Chocolate (105 calories, 9g fat, 3g net carbs, 3g protein)

Day Seven

(Totals: 1609 calories, 128g fat, 18g net carbs, 90g protein)

Breakfast:

2 Cream Cheese Pancakes (172 calories, 14g fat, 1g net carbs, 8g protein)
2 pcs cooked bacon (92 calories, 7g fat, 0g net carbs, 6g protein)
Coffee with 2 Tbsp Heavy Cream (120 calories, 12g fat, 1g net carbs, 0g protein)

Snack

2 String Cheese (160 calories, 12g fat, 2g net carbs, 16g protein)

Lunch

1/2 cup “Anti” Pasta Salad (102 calories, 8g fat, 4g net carbs, 3g protein)
4 Sundried Tomato & Feta Meatballs (356 calories, 32g fat, 2.5g net carbs, 24g protein)

Snack

1 cup bone broth (50 calories, 1g fat, 0g net carbs, 1g protein)

Dinner

1 cup Cuban Pot Roast (taco salad style) (271 calories, 19g fat, 2g net carbs, 20g protein)
2 cups chopped romaine lettuce (16 calories, 0g fat, 1g net carbs, 1g protein)
2 Tbsp sour cream (51 calories, 5g fat, 1g net carbs, 1g protein)
1 Tbsp chopped cilantro (optional)
1/4 cup shredded cheddar cheese (114 calories, 9g fat, .5g net carbs, 7g protein)

Dessert

2 squares Lindt 90% Chocolate (105 calories, 9g fat, 3g net carbs, 3g protein)

source;www.nodiet.

baconcauli2small-648x950

BACON & SMOKED GOUDA CAULIFLOWER MASH (LOW CARB AND GLUTEN FREE)

Friends, I have created something spectacular.

This low carb cauliflower puree is so amazing, that even though after tasting it I immediately wanted to hide in the closet with a giant spoon rather than waste time taking photos of it, my conscience wouldn’t allow me NOT to share it with you TONIGHT!

This simple, humble dish is SO DELICIOUS, that even though I just got home after a long day and should be working on the overdue Spring ezine cover design, or this week’s keto menu plan which is due Saturday morning, I STOPPED THE PRESSES on everything else so I could share this with you RIGHT THIS MINUTE!

That’s how confident I am that you will want to make this delicious keto cauliflower mash immediately.

*pauses to take another bite*     *and another*     *and another*      *sigh*

What is this ambrosia of which I speak? It’s so simple, yet so sublime, and like many of my favorites, born of a desperate desire for something tasty for dinner – cobbled together quickly and with whatever I have on hand.

I started with a batch of of the “Better than Potatoes” Cheesy Cauliflower Puree, and then I added a few of slices of cooked bacon, and a chunk of Smoked Gouda cheese. I pureed until smooth and heated it in the microwave for another minute – then topped it with a decadent pat of butter and some more kosher salt.

It’s silky, smoky, bacony perfection in every bite! So much better than even your wildest imagination could…er…imagine.

 

A keto, atkins and paleo friendly low carb cauliflower puree from I Breathe I'm Hungry

In addition to solving my what’s for dinner dilemma (for the rest of my life) this low carb cauliflower puree recipe has also caused me to have an epiphany. Dear friends, I have been looking at my family situation all wrong!

You see, it used to upset me that Mr. Hungry and Hungry Jr. were immune to the joys of cauliflower. Despite my repeated attempts to lure them over to the cauliflower fan club, they have thus far remained unconvinced of it’s virtues.

This recipe made me realize that MY LIFE IS PERFECT AS IT IS! I first tasted this and thought, “I bet they would actually LIKE this one,” which was immediately followed by “but then I would have to SHARE it, and that would JUST.NOT.DO.”

So I slunk into my office with my still steaming bowl – where I sit now, writing this post and taking intermittent bites, all while keeping an eye on the door to make sure nobody comes wandering in looking for a life-altering taste!

Oh don’t feel too bad for the guys – I’ll share a batch with them…. eventually….

Meanwhile, I’ll be stocking up on Smoked Gouda and cauliflower like a maniac (my freezer is already full of bacon of course!) Your local Costco is out of Smoked Gouda? Sorry, that was me. You snooze you lose, Peeps – all’s fair in love and cheese!

So get thee some Smoked Gouda (while you still can), a head of cauliflower, and some bacon, then put this amazing low carb cauliflower puree together ASAP!

If your family already likes cauliflower, my sage advice to you is:

a) HIDE,  or b) Make A LOT!

 

low carb cauliflower puree recipe from I Breathe Im Hungry

Now I’m off to get back to this week’s Keto Menu Plan – which will, you guessed it, feature this steaming bowl of deliciousness FO’ SHO’! In fact, I might just put it down for breakfast, lunch, and dinner EVERY SINGLE DAY. (Wow, that would actually make my night go a lot faster….) Ok, I won’t really, but it would be AWESOME if I DID!

In fact I guarantee that after you taste this low carb cauliflower puree recipe, you’ll wish I had! 😉

 

BACON & SMOKED GOUDA CAULIFLOWER MASH (LOW CARB AND GLUTEN FREE)
Silky, smoky, bacony perfection – your family will request this low carb and gluten free side dish recipe over and over again!
Serves: Approximately 3 cups
INGREDIENTS
  • 4 cups cauliflower florets
  • 3 Tbsp heavy cream
  • 2 Tbsp butter
  • ½ tsp kosher salt
  • ¼ tsp black pepper
  • ¼ tsp garlic powder
  • 4 slices of cooked bacon
  • ⅓ cup shredded Smoked Gouda cheese
  • salt and pepper to taste
INSTRUCTIONS
  1. Place the cauliflower, heavy cream, butter, salt, pepper, and garlic powder in a microwave safe dish. Microwave on high for 18 – 20 minutes, or until soft. Transfer the cauliflower and liquid to a magic bullet or food processor. Add the bacon and Smoked Gouda. Blend until smooth and creamy. Season with additional salt and pepper as desired.
NOTES
Approximate nutrition info per cup: 282 calories, 22g fat, 2g net carbs, 12g protein
NUTRITION INFORMATION
Serving size: 1 cup
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The Brighter side of Echolalia in Autism

What is Echolalia Autism

What is Echolalia?

what is echolalia

Fig 2: Echolalia in Conversation

Echolalia is a form of unconventional verbal behaviors such as repeating a conversation, television program or part of a movie/play word for word. Even the inflections or tones and patterns of the conversation will be replicated by the subject.

Echolalia is part of normal language development and is somewhat spontaneous in children. It is much like “parroting”. A phrase or sentence can be remembered and repeated; often in the same context it was originally heard. This means that if a child learns a phrase from a cartoon or movie and relates it to a feeling of anger or happiness, that phrase will be used in the event of a similar scenario. It does not necessarily mean that the child understands where the phrase fits.

With age, your child should normally grow out of using echolalia. However, symptoms persist, it is time to see your physician with regard to echolalia in autism.

What is Echolalia Autism?

Echolalia and autism usually go hand in hand with children diagnosed with ASD.  Usually, kids with echolalia and Autism lack the language processing skills necessary to put a phrase within the proper context.

Echolalia in children diagnosed on the Autism Spectrum can be a positive thing. It indicates that the child is at least processing the language; they hear it even though their response may be at a sub-functional level. But it’s a sign that there may be meaningful language and speech development in the future.

Echolalia provides hope that an autistic child will eventually learn to communicate efficiently. However, it does not imply that the child will learn to use the right words in their correct context or with the correct meaning of the word. Often, with autism spectrum disorders, the child is unaware of some social skills and may misinterpret the usage of the phrase.

Symptoms of Echolalia Autism

Parroting in Echolalia

Symptoms of Echolalia Autism

Fig 3: Symptoms of Echolalia Autism

another sign of echolalia in autism

Fig 4: Another sign of Echolalia in Autism

As a parent who spends most of your time with your child, you should be able to determine if phrases and sentences are uttered without an understanding of what they mean. You can readily spot these if your child blurts out a phrase in the middle of a conversation for which there is no relevance.

Some  autistic children with echolalia use these phrases to remember directions that have been given to them. For example, a child may say, “wash your hands before you eat“, as they are washing their hands before dinner. This is a clear sign that echolalia is being used by your child to help them remember the order of certain processes. A child with echolalia autism will often verbalize learned directions when they are under stress. This is their way of remembering what to do and to blot out the stressor.

Upon recognition by parents that a child is using phrases beyond their language skills and seeking out medical advice and therapy, there is a good chance that your child’s cognitive and language skills will develop. The good news is that Echolalia often increases eye contact and spontaneity in a child.

Your child might come to you and ask to put their shoes on when what they really mean is that they want to go outside. For an autistic child, this is progress. They have associated going outside with putting on their shoes.

Often, as parents and educators, we ask many questions. For children with echolalia and autism, questions may result in a blank stare or no response. I encourage parents to ask fewer questions and give directions about what you want your child to do. This is how your child learns! It is called positive reinforcement. You have the opportunity to say exactly what you want your child to say in context to a situation. Because they will mimic your words you must be careful to use the same phrase to mean the same thing and under the same situation each time you say it. Understanding what works for your child is the key here.

Mary Alexa, Echolalia Autism Speech Therapist

Therapies for Echolalia Autism

Using Puppet Play

Puppet play to simulate speech-action coordination in Echolalia Autism is an excellent technique

Fig 5: Puppet play to simulate Speech-Action coordination in Echolalia Autism is an excellent technique

You can do some therapy at home during playtime by simulating conversations using puppets. You can use full hand puppets, finger puppets or even stuffed animals for this purpose. Your child with Echolalia would naturally want to imitate things you say in a situation. So, put a puppet in a similar scenario and say exactly what you want as the response to that very situation. Narrative or puppet play is EXCELLENT for your child. Upon repeating this exercise over a few days, you may be surprised to hear your child playing puppets by themselves by using exactly the same scenarios and words. Soon, their cognitive abilities fall into place and they have a true sense of the connection between the word and their meanings.

Improvising Your Child’s Words

Another great way to work with your child is by modeling what you want them to say in a particular situation. Forget the questions! If your child is reaching for a cookie don’t say “do you want a cookie”. You should say “I want a cookie”. This is what you want your child to say when they want a cookie, right! Always keep in mind with echolalia, repetition or echoing is the response that is initiated. Saying good night to your child or goodbye should not include their name. You may find this odd at first. However, if you use normal figure of speech, like “Goodnight Tommy“,  they will associate repeating the same phrase goodnight with their name to everyone they wish goodnight to.

The Brighter side of Echolalia in Autism

the brighter side of echolalia autism

Fig 6: Echolalia Autism – The Silver Lining

There is a silver lining to echolalia autism! Your child is talking, trying and learning to communicate while adapting to essential social skills and emotions. This is one part of autism therapy that you can see unfold right before your eyes! It may seem frustrating at times, but isn’t it great to hear your child communicating rather than living in silence?

As a mom, I would much rather have my child kiss me “Goodnight Tommy” and close the door with a smile than retire in silence and despair. You know what is possible and you can tap yourself on the shoulder, hold your head up high and sleep well as your child progresses one step at a time while under your guidance and watchful eyes!

SOURCE;http://www.dealwithautism.com

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Baby’s born 3 months early. Dad films first year of baby’s life and result is beautiful

dad-films-premature-baby-first-year-of-life-featured

Every parent dreads the nightmare scenario of delivering a premature child. Although the likelihood of a premature baby surviving has increased due to new technology, it still is an upward battle for a premature baby to survive. Not only is the baby affected, but the parents too. They’re the ones who have to deal with the stress of making sure their baby survives.

A premature baby’s future is simple unpredictable and I would never want such a tragedy to befall any parents. Unfortunately, luck didn’t favor the Miles family.

Ward Miles was 3 1/2 months premature and was just 1 1/2 pounds when he was born. For the next 107 days, Ward remained in the hospital, fighting to stay alive. Benjamin, Ward’s father, wanted to make sure that no matter what happened, he would remember their short time together. So he decided to document Ward’s life every day to try and inspire others through Ward overcoming his obstacles.

Get prepared to have your heart strings pulled as you watch this video. There were moments that left me in tears, while they were moments that put a big smile on my face. I hope you enjoy this video as much I did and are inspired as much as I was!

What did you think? Wasn’t this video touching? We want to hear your thoughts. Let us know in the comments below!

Please SHARE this touching video with your friends and family.

source;http://benjaminscot

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Success: A Severe Tic Disorder Treated through Environmental Medicine

I hope this case report will help shed light on how a biomedical and environmental approach to a serious tic disorder can be useful.

Personal History: MC is a 13-year-old girl.

Background Information: This patient began seeing me approximately three years ago. She had been seen by a neurologist and psychiatrist and her condition had received a diagnosis of TS, as well as one of obsessive-compulsive behavior. She also had a number of other physical symptoms, including nosebleeds, bedwetting, itching, and headaches.

The patient had a history of frequent ear infections, with a treatment history that included tubes in the ears, and frequent rounds of antibiotics. She also had a history of frequent stomachaches and yeast infections as an infant. Her mother was very concerned; MC also had significant gastrointestinal symptoms, including diarrhea, abdominal gas, belching, and rectal itching.

Her neurologist had noted paroxysmal episodes of blacking out but basically kept to a diagnosis of a tic-like disorder. Her tic-like disorder included eye blinking, head shaking, sniffing, and a smelling type of aberration. She also licked her fingers and had behavioral difficlties.

Past Medical History: Her past medical history included a parasitic infection, Cryptosporidium, in 1998.

Environmental History: The family lived in a farm-like area. They lived surrounded by many types of animals, including dogs, cats, cows, horses, chickens, and rabbits—all of them outdoors.

Medications: MC had been on a regimen of many medications to control her symptoms, including: (1) Topamax; (2) Prozac; (3) Provigil; and (4) a number of other psychopharmacologic agents, including Geodon and Risperdal.

Allergy history and testing: MC was tested and found to be allergic to pollens, dusts, molds, and some foods, including cow’s milk. She had significant sensitivities to 18 allergens. She had never been allergy tested before coming to my office. We were required to wait until she was out of school for summer vacation to take her off psychiatric medications in order for her to be appropriately allergy skin tested.

Laboratory testing results: The results of her stool study indicated that she had a 4+ (highest level) yeast infection in the gut.

Treatment plan:

  • We placed her on antifungal medications to treat a rash under her arms.
  • We began use of antifungal creams and initiated a low-yeast diet to treat rectal itching.
  • We placed her on vitamin K daily to treat the nosebleeds.
  • She was advised to avoid fabric softeners and other scented products.
  • We took her off psychiatric medications.
  • We advised her family to have MC avoid milk.
  • We placed her on natural antifungal medications, including acidophilus to treat the yeast infection in the gut, which seemed to help. We also started her on a program of Diflucan and Nystatin, which are medications for fungal infections.

Treatment results: We were gradually able to take her off psychotropic medications and onto a full course of allergy immunotherapy, environmental controls, nutritional supplementation, and appropriate antifungal medications. She remains on Prozac only. Originally, she was getting sinus infections approximately every other month. Within 1 year of treatment with allergy immunotherapy, her sinus infections were completely under control. Within approximately 6 months of receiving allergy immunotherapy, most of MC’s tic disorder was gone and most of her other symptoms had also completely subsided.

Summary: Once MC began allergy immunotherapy and was weaned off the psychotropic medicines, most of MC’s symptoms were relieved by 6 months. Also, appropriate nutritional supplements and environmental controls may have played a major role immunologically. (We treated her as we did patients who are chemically sensitive, advising the family to avoid the use of fabric softeners, and all fragranced and toxic products for home and personal use.)

All of these improved environmental factors brought MC to below her threshold of (tic) reactivity. She was having much less respiratory, neurologic, gastrointestinal, and skin symptoms. MC’s regimen, once completely in place, included a comprehensive environmental approach:

  • allergy immunotherapy, including injections twice weekly for pollens, dust, molds, animal danders, and foods;
  • avoidance of allergen triggers, including highly allergic foods, animals, and chemicals;
  • environmental controls to reduce allergens in her bedroom;
  • nutritional supplements based on her biochemistry;
  • medication and natural supplements to treat a hidden yeast infection that affected her immune system;
  • education in understanding the environmental medicine approach to her complex multisystem tic disorder, with individualized attention, periodical fine-tuning, and care of the whole person.

As a result of treatment, her symptoms were controlled without the need for standard symptom-relieving medications.

The family’s account of MC’s recovery

Sheila J Rogers, Director ACN,  interviewed MC and her mother for this account

Serious symptoms

MC had such severe neuropsychiatric symptoms that the parents were told she should be hospitalized. The symptoms began when she was being potty trained as a toddler. She began withholding her stools and required treatment with three different stool softeners. At age 3 years, MC started the behavior of sniffing her food. Sniffing the food actually seemed more important to her than eating it. She also began making little noises, sometimes letting out a high-pitched scream. As MC was well-behaved, social, and bright, little was made of these behaviors; she “seemed to just be playing around.”

At age 3 years, MC had some speech articulation difficulties and received occupational therapy. In second grade, the teacher noted the beginning of MC’s academic difficulties and the abnormally long time it took MC to complete written work.

As MC’s behavior continued to change, meals soon became a battle; MC wouldn’t eat anything that had the “wrong” texture, preferring everything soft. She would wear only old clothes that felt smooth on her skin. She wore the same set of clothes for 2 years, because the feel of new clothes bothered her. Wearing shoes drove her crazy, and socks had to be seamless.

Ritalin and more problems

In fourth grade, MC was evaluated and found to be gifted but a learning disability was also revealed. A neurologist suggested that MC had attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and started her on Ritalin, though she didn’t seem hyperactive to her parents. Within 6 weeks, MC became verbally hyper, began banging her head on surfaces, and was on such “overload” that she would lie down on the floor at school to shut things out. She began withdrawing, and her tics worsened. She had already shown mild signs of obsessive compulsive behavior, but now it was much worse. Every time MC got in or out of the family van, she had to close and open the door a certain number of times and make special steps while walking. She also had trouble concentrating. Things were quickly spiraling downward. MC was taken off Ritalin, but the tics remained. She began to space out—particularly when exposed to fluorescent lights. She would describe this by saying, “My lights are going out.” She was evaluated and found not to have epilepsy.

Further medicating: MC’s mother shares

We made the rounds to doctors for work-ups—gastroenterologists, neurologists, psychiatrists; she underwent MRIs and other numerous tests. We ended up with a diagnosis of TS from one specialist and a severe tic disorder from another. MC was put on trials of medications, sometimes three at a time. She was repeating words, speaking rapidly, and making noises. Eye squints and head jerks were frequent. The mediations included Prozac, Clonidine, Zyprexa, Seroquil, Topamax, and others. We actually reached a point where we were treating the reactions to the medications! MC was often so sleepy that she had to be removed from the classroom in a wheelchair.

Although the tics were reduced, the cost of the side effects was too high. She was in therapy, but I never thought that was an answer. A school psychologist suggested that I quit teaching and keep her at home. A psychiatrist concluded that MC needed to be admitted to a psychiatric hospital! I refused their advice and tried not to let MC know how scared I was.

During the last significant drug trials in which MC was a participant, a couple of years ago, MC was put on Provigil, which resulted in major sedation and angry, defiant behavior. When a doctor observed her anger, he advised the family to have MC hospitalized. MC’s mother insisted that the anger was a reaction to the drug and began weaning her off of it. The anger ceased. However, at this point, MC was so distracted and spacey that she had to be dressed every morning. Everything became a major effort. She began not leaving the house, even to see a movie. The family couldn’t imagine what her future would be or how they would find the help they needed. (At this time they learned of environmental medicine and reached the office of Dr. Albert Robbins.)

In middle school, MC had to dictate answers to her school work to a parent, who would write them down.

“I got my sweet daughter back!”

According to MC’s mother, dietary changes, supplements, and treatment for Candida yeast overgrowth made a big difference in MC’s behavior. Allergy therapy was started and was very successful. MC is now only taking Prozac. MC’s mother added, “She’s doing fantastically. It’s been 3 years of restored health and I can’t believe it—I got my sweet daughter back! MC is 14 years old now, doing well in advanced classes in school, and working independently. She is socially adjusted and happy once more. She takes the recommended supplements and allergy injections without complaining. We stopped the psychotherapy because now that she’s off the drugs she doesn’t need it. When I look back I can’t believe the awful experience we all went through—all because of a Candida infection and allergies.”

source;http://latitudes.org/

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Parenting With Chronic Pain From Syringomyelia: Alisha’s Story

Each month, Mothering With Chronic Pain will spotlight a different mother battling chronic pain or illness. Alisha Taylor, who lives with syringomyelia, is our featured mom for the month of November.

Alisha Taylor

Imagine a hot coal burning inside your spine. It’s there all the time. You can never remove it, and no one can take it out for you. Alisha Taylor is a mom living in a small town in Northern California, and that’s how she describes the excruciating pain which has been an everyday reality for her throughout the past decade.

Alisha’s official diagnosis is syringomyelia, a rare spinal cord condition affecting only about eight out of every 100,000 people. Syringomyelia causes irreversible damage to the spine and nerves, resulting in widespread pain and weakness. In people with syringomyelia, a pocket of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), known as a syrinx, accumulates within the spinal cord. Alisha’s syrinx is 7.4mm wide and spans from the C4 to T1 areas of her spine.

Alisha is a mom of three children, ages fourteen, seven, and two. Of her three children, Alisha feels the worst for her youngest. “I’m not the mom I want to be to her, or like I was with my first two,” she reveals. “My condition has gotten progressively worse since my diagnosis.”

Alisha is relieved that she was diagnosed when her youngest child was only nine months old, otherwise she may not have decided to have another child. Despite the struggles and pain she endures, she loves being a mom and feels that her children have prevented her from feeling sorry for herself.

Alisha's three children

Everyday activities that most healthy people take for granted are incredibly challenging for a person living with syringomyelia. “My pain makes it hard for me to do regular chores around the house and certain activities some days. My weight limit for lifting is only eight pounds, and my baby is closer to thirty [pounds].” Alisha’s house is located “off grid,” so her daily routine includes chores like lifting gas cans, bringing in firewood, and pushing wheelbarrows – all while living with pain most people could never imagine enduring.

Understandably, Alisha envies parents who can live their lives and spend time with their children without having to worry about pain and illness. “I watch them interact with their kids, run, jump, play, and it depresses me sometimes. I always plan around my pain,” she explains. Like many parents with chronic pain, Alisha regrets the unpredictability of her condition and the need to to cancel plans with friends and family. “With syringomyelia, there is no telling how you are going to feel from one day to the next.”

Because Alisha lives in an isolated small town, getting treatment for her rare condition can be difficult. Often, she is treated like a drug addict rather than as a person in desperate need of pain relief in order to function. Her primary treatment plan includes a narcotic and a muscle relaxer, and she has encountered doctors who treat her like a “criminal” for requiring a prescription for an opioid medication.

Unfortunately, some of Alisha’s friends also believe she is addicted to prescription painkillers. While syringomyelia is misunderstood by many people, including medical professionals, Alisha remains hopeful about her future and continues to fight for the care she deserves. This month, she has an appointment to see a pain management doctor, and she has a referral to see doctors at the University of California.

Alisha wishes the world understood that syringomyelia is an invisible disease. “It eats away at your self-confidence, your ability to do what others take for granted, and there is no cure,” Alisha relates. While surgery is an option, Alisha’s doctors have told her that there is only a twenty percent chance of improvement. Surgery could even worsen her condition, or worse – paralyze her.

Alisha would also like other mothers newly diagnosed with syringomyelia to know that they are not “not crazy or lazy.” She has some powerful and inspiring words for other mothers with chronic pain: “Fight for your treatment and rest as much as possible. Rest is key to this illness. And as with any chronic illness, come to terms with it as soon as possible, know your limitations, and ask for help. It’s out there. You just gotta go and find it.”

Alisha is an inspiration to other mothers with chronic illness, and her courage in sharing her story provides hope to our community.

source;http://momswithpain.com

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Sensory Processing Disorder and hecks of “Out-of-Sync” child

Sensory issues were new to me when my son Liam got an autism diagnosis at age 3. When his occupational therapist gave me Carol Kranowitz’s fantastic book The Out-of-Sync Child, I learned Liam’s overstressed sensory system might be causing many of his behaviors. It was a life-changing realization. I had the chance to speak with Kranowitz recently, and I’m excited to share a bit of her wisdom here.

Child on a swing

1. Let’s start with the basics: What is sensory processing disorder?

Difficulty in the way the central nervous system takes in, organizes, and uses sensory messages from one’s body and from the environment. The brain-behavior connection is very strong, so when the brain (at the head of the central nervous system) reacts in unusual ways to ordinary sensations, the person’s behavioral responses will be ineffective. SPD interferes with movement, emotions, attention, relationships, and doing what one wants to do.

2. How did you get started working with and writing about “out-of-sync” kids?

I taught music, movement, and drama to preschoolers for 25 years, and I wondered and worried about children who seemed to be “out of sync.” To help them become more competent in their work and play, I studied sensory processing and sensory integration (“SI”) theory. I learned to identify my young students’ needs and steer them into early intervention.

3. What advice would you give to a parent who thinks their child has SPD?

– Find a pediatric occupational therapist who uses a sensory integration approach in her practice. You can find an OT practicing OT-SI at www.spdfoundation.net.

– Pediatricians may not know to suggest this kind of treatment, so if a doctor can’t or won’t help, don’t be discouraged. Doctors need a lot of educating. Also, keep in mind that while SPD is a neurological disorder, most neurologists do not know what to do about it.

– Read, read, read! Along with my books these are also great resources: Sensational Kids, bt Lucy Jane Miller, and Raising a Sensory-Smart Child, by Lindsey Biel and Nancy Peske.

– Put on imaginary “sensory goggles” and ask yourself: What sensations (touches, sounds, etc.) may be putting your child on overload? Can you minimize them? Lower the sensory load by dimming the lights, turning down the TV volume, not bringing fresh lilacs into the house…

What sensations may your child NOT be getting that he or she really needs? (such as movement, fresh air, the taste of healthful foods) Some kids, with or without SPD, need a lot of vigorous activity every day. Everybody needs to stretch and move around for about 10 minutes out of every hour. Lack of movement may be making the child fidgety, inattentive, irritable, and out of sync. Can you maximize sensory experiences for the child who needs them?

4. What are some ways to help children and parents better live with SPD?

– Get your child moving and go outdoors, everyday. Swimming pool, sandbox, swing set. Walk the dog, jog to the corner.

– What is your child’s passion? Go with it! Dinosaurs? Make an obstacle course in the back yard featuring dinosaurs’ habitats. The wading pool becomes an ocean, the mud puddle a swamp, the sandbox a desert, etc. Make Dinosaur salad. Build Dinosaur skeletons with ice cream sticks and toothpicks. Honor passion wherever you find it — and make it sensory fun.

– Limit electronics. Sitting in front of computers or video games is bad for vision, posture, gross-motor development, social development, communication skills, and I could go on and on. Electronics engage two senses (visual and auditory). We have eight senses. Let’s use them all!

– Make sure the child gets sufficient sleep. Children should wake up in the morning refreshed, without an alarm clock.

5. How would you suggest helping children get over frightening sensory experiences?

It depends on the experience, but here are some examples that parents can draw from. Is your child is afraid of going to the playground? Being amidst lots of moving, shouting kids can be overwhelming, so go to the playground in the early morning or late afternoon when it isn’t crowded. Stay close to your child. Bring a ball with you.

Is your child over-responsive, tending to avoid ordinary playground fun? Let him sway on the swing on his tummy, or clamber back and forth over the edge of the sandbox a dozen times, or duck into the little house and just sit there for a while.

Is your child a sensory craver, always seeking new, exciting and maybe dare-devilish activity? Let her swing high, but not for too long. Let her dig and get muddy in the sandbox. Let her slide headfirst down the slide and be there to catch her!

Get a therapy ball and gym mat and practice movement experiences at home. There are many ways to gently get a child comfortable with being a little off balance, or moving a little bit in new directions.

Trying a new food?

Start with putting one small floret of broccoli on the plate. Your child doesn’t have to touch it. Next week, she does have to touch it. The next week, she needs to bring it to her lips. Then, kiss it. Then place it in her mouth.

Being hugged and kissed by a relative?

Squeeze your child yourself, really really tight, before Grandma comes. Rub the child’s arms and legs with sponges and washcloths to desensitize the skin. Have the child shove furniture around, vacuum the rug, or suck applesauce through a straw to get some calming proprioceptive input. Think “calm,” especially before a transition or an exciting event.

source;http://www.parents.com/

fritatta

Low Carb Frittata With Bell Peppers And Onions- BEST EVER RECIPE

Losing weight doesn’t mean you have to sacrifice flavor—these low-carb recipes are filling and delicious.

low-carb diet to lose weight is nothing new, but there are a lot of misconceptions about what you’re allowed to eat. Over the years the diet has gotten a bad rep because people assume it means noshing on tons of red meat, butter, and few veggies. But, it’s actually less restrictive than you think.

Thai food? Check! Mexican? Check! Macaroni n’ cheese? Yup, even that classic comfort food is on the menu. The key is to choose high-fiber nutrient-dense carbohydrates like sweet potatoes and other root vegetables instead of ones like white rice. Combine that with healthy fats and optimal protein intake and your body will be fortified with the nutrients it needs. Plus, this type of diet will keep your appetite in check and provide fuel for your body, helping you power through a tough workout.

On top of shedding some pounds, there are some major health benefits to a low-carb diet, too. Studies show that certain risk factors for heart disease and insulin resistance improve when people follow a controlled carbohydrate program (e.g. triglyceride levels can decrease on average 44%, HDL good cholesterol increases, inflammation markers improve, and markers for pre diabetes disappear).

 

Not just for breakfast: Frittatas make great quick dinners.  Serve with a fresh salad to round out the meal.

Skill level: Intermediate

Start to Finish: 50 to 60 minutes

Prep: 20 minutes

Cook: 20 to 30 minutes

Ingredients:

8 large eggs
2 cups egg whites (about 16 large egg whites)
1/4 cup 2% milk
1/2 teaspoon fresh lemon juice
1 cup chopped red onions
1/2 cup chopped red bell peppers
1/2 cup chopped yellow bell peppers
1/8 teaspoon extra virgin olive oil
1/4 teaspoon sea salt
Pinch freshly ground black pepper
1 cup shredded cheddar cheese

Instructions:

1) Preheat oven to 375º.

2) In a large mixing bowl, whisk together eggs, egg whites, milk and lemon juice.

3) Heat olive oil in a large sauté pan over medium-high heat. Sauté onions and bell peppers until tender and season with salt and pepper.

4) Add cheese and sautéed vegetables to egg mixture and stir until combined.

5) Pour mixture into a 9″ cake pan.

6) Bake frittata in oven until eggs are cooked and cheese is melted, about 20-30 minutes. Remove from oven, let cool briefly and cut into 8 pieces.

Nutritional information (per serving): Calories 175; Carbs 6 g; Fat 6 g; Protein 20 g

SOURCE;http://www.mensfitness.com/

Donna Thornburrow, 34, from Currock, Carlisle, who suffers from chiari malformation, a condition where the lower part of the brain pushes down into the spinal canal; 15 November 2016. PAULA THANNER

‘I’d rather give birth 5 times a day than this’ says mum with rare condition syringomyelia

Donna Thornburrow

A woman suffering from an incurable illness hopes to raise awareness of it and meet others in a similar condition

The most heartbreaking part of Donna Thornborrow’s situation is that she feels like a failure.

The 34-year-old keeps a track of her symptoms in a journal: short term memory loss, sleep apnea, confusion, slurring speech, struggling to walk, balance issues, muscle weakness, swallowing problems, incontinence, shooting back pains and mind hammering headaches.

At the bottom of one of the pages, outlined in a circle is written: “Biggest one is I feel like a failure”.

Donna, of Lediard Avenue, Currock, Carlisle, suffers from Arnold Chiari malformation type two and Syringomyelia. She was prompted to speak out about the conditions after seeing Lauren Gill’s article in the News and Star.

Lauren, 28, of St Elizabeth Close, Harraby, Carlisle, also suffers from Chiari malformation, an incurable condition where part of the cerebellum and brainstem descends below the opening at the base of the skull, and Syringomyelia, a disorder in which a cyst or cavity forms within the spinal cord.

The News & Star published a story about her shopping trip to Aldi when she discovered she had lost her credit card at the till but was saved by cashier Fi Parkinson, who paid for her shopping.

A post about the moment of kindness was published on Spotted: Carlisle’s Facebook page and has been shared and liked more than 6,300 times.

Donna and Lauren have not met but they are in touch as both say it is useful to talk to someone suffering from the same conditions.

Donna’s life, like Lauren’s, has been completely transformed by the Arnold Chiari malformation and Syringomyelia.

Three years ago, Donna was working full time as a mental health nurse in a Carlisle care home when she started feeling depressed.

“I loved it, I absolutely loved my job and all the people I worked with,” said Donna. But she had to leave as her symptoms worsened and she started feeling very dizzy and off balance.

“It was like I was drunk,” said Donna. “I was too scared to tell anybody. I thought I was going crazy.”

Since her symptoms started about three years ago, Donna has become virtually housebound. She had a major operation on her brain last year to try and alleviate her symptoms but she is still in constant pain.

“I would go through childbirth five times a day rather than that [pain],” she said. “I can’t move. I end up living in my bedroom.”

Donna said she feels like a failure because she can’t look after her three children: Amy Bain, 12, Aidan Bain, 14 and Josh Bain, 18.

The three children live at home with her and help care for her, along with other carers.

She misses many things about having a good bill of health, especially working.

Donna said: “I miss being a normal person. I feel like I’m failing my kids because I feel like I’m not being a proper mum to them.

“I have got carers coming in twice a day to help out. I shouldn’t have to have them at my age.”

Donna is hoping to get a new wheelchair at the end of November so she can start going out on her own for the first time in more than two years.

She said since her illness started more than two years ago she has lost many friends and her social life is virtually non existent.

She also wants to connect with other people suffering from similar conditions in the local area and hopes that by speaking out she will raise awareness of Chiari malformation and Syringomyelia and its devastating symptoms.

source;http://www.newsandstar.co.uk/

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the world’s best sandwich Bacon Lettuce and Tomato with Oopsie Bread 2% Carb-Diet Program

No, you don’t have to say goodbye to the world’s best sandwich just because you’ve chosen not to eat regular bread. Here’s an even better BLT with healthy low-carb oopsie bread.

Image result for Bacon Lettuce and Tomato with Oopsie Bread

Ingredients

  • 8 pieces of oopsie breads or other low-carb bread
  • 6 – 8 tablespoons mayonnaise
  • 5 oz. bacon
  • lettuce
  • 1 tomato, thinly sliced
  • fresh basil

Image result for Bacon Lettuce and Tomato with Oopsie Bread

  • Instructions

    • Start by frying the bacon slices.
    • Place the oopsie bread pieces top surface down.
    • Spread 1–2 tablespoon of homemade mayonnaise on each.
    • Place lettuce, tomato, some finely chopped fresh basil and fried bacon in layers between the bread halves.
    • Serve immediately.

      Oopsie bread recipe

Oopsie bread

Ketogenic low carb

86% Fat

11% Protein

2% Carbs

source;http://dietdoctor.com