120 Zero Carb Foods List+4 Day No Carb Meal Plan- Best Weight Loss Program

Imagine a zero carb world where nervous counting doesn’t exist. If you’re starting low carb, speeding up ketosis or in Atkins Induction, no carb foods will set you free.

  • Tips for going zero carb
  • How to read no carb food labels
  • Real life zero carb food experience and 6 week food log
  • Printable list of no carb foods
  • 4 Day no carb meal plan

 

The list of low carb foods is HUGE. Zero carb foods are more limited, especially in the fruit and veggie area. But there are still over 100 choices for rich satisfying meals.

 

no carb food list mushroom cap

 

Finding foods with zero carbs isn’t hard. Use our zero carb and (almost) zero carb food lists, read package labels carefully and be pleasantly surprised at all the options.

 

Using the No Carb Foods List

Technically speaking, fats are the only foods that are completely zero carb. Even meats and seafood have trace amounts.

What You Must Know:

The foods on this list have very minor amounts of net carbs – fractions of a gram. These foods are so close to zero, most low carbers consider them ‘no carb foods.’

The “almost” zero carb foods are a bit higher, but a single serving from the list is still under 1 net carb.

One Warning:

Track your servings. Trace amounts of carbs still add up.

 

Tips for Going Zero Carb

You’ve decided to go low – really low. These three easy tips simplify starting your zero carb diet.

 

Give yourself a few days to prepare.

Check your fridge and cabinets, move any higher carb foods to the side, and fill the space with your favorite no carb foods.

Plan a zero carb grocery trip and stock up!

 

Focus on what you ARE allowed to eat.

Zero carb foods are savory and delicious. You won’t feel like you’re depriving yourself.

 

Have fun. Try new things.

If you are eating foods with no carbs, you are cooking more often. Having some fun with your food is a good way to build positive associations.

 

Chef-Pro Silicone Gloves

Tired of bulky oven mitts? Chef-Pro’s silicone oven gloves are ultra-convenient for grilling, BBQ, cooking and baking. Insulated & waterproof.

Chef-Pro Silicone Gloves for no carb foods

 

 

Real Life Zero Carb Food Log

What’s it really like to go zero carb? Rebecca Latham of Low Carb Better Health went zero carb, keeping food logs for six weeks:

Rebecca-zero-carb-foods    I am eating meat, a small amount of dairy, some healthy fats and I am drinking water only.

I have also been eating Fat Bombs, which contain almond butter, cocoa power and Stevia.

I am carefully tracking what I am eating. Here is what I have learned so far about how my blood sugar reacts to food.

 

No Carb Food Labels

Many food labels list foods as having zero carbs. Labeling laws allow food companies to print “zero grams” on the label if the food has less than one gram of carbs.

Sugar substitutes, cheeses, eggs and spices are common examples of this situation. If you’re being extra cautious, count them as .5 net carbs per serving.

 

List of No Carb Foods

There are zero carb foods in almost every food group, so it’s easy to enjoy a variety of foods when going no carb.

Below are foods that have zero carbs based on the National Nutrient Database published by the US Department of Agriculture.

 

Zero Carb Meat

High in protein and vitamins, most natural meats have zero carbs.

Packaged, cured and processed meats (sausage, hot dogs, deli meat, bacon, etc.) have some carbs due to added flavoring, preservatives or starchy binders.

Be sure to check the labels.

These natural meats have no carbs:

  • Beef
  • Veal
  • Lamb
  • Pork
  • Fowl (turkey, chicken, duck, goose, hen, quail)
  • Organ Meats (brains, tongue, liver, heart, kidneys)
  • Game Meats (venison, bison, ostrich, caribou, elk)
  • Exotic Meats (such as ostrich and emu)

 

Zero Carb Seafood

Fresh (unprocessed) seafood is zero carb:

  • Cod
  • Flounder
  • Sole
  • Haddock
  • Halibut
  • Sardine
  • Swordfish
  • Tuna
  • Trout
  • Salmon
  • Catfish
  • Bass
  • Crab
  • Shrimp
  • Lobster
  • Squid
  • Oysters
  • Mussels
  • Clams

 

Zero Carb Seasoning

Flavoring zero carb foods makes them much more palatable.

There are over 60 low carb spices to choose from – and eight of them speed up fat loss.

  • Salt and Pepper
  • Vinegar
  • Ground Cinnamon
  • Most Hot Sauces
  • Pre-mixed Seasonings (check the label)
  • Yellow Mustard
  • Dill weed
  • Chives

 

Zero Carb Oils and Fats

The following fats and oils have zero carbs:

  • Olive oil
  • Coconut oil
  • Grass-fed butter
  • MCT oil
  • Avocado oil
  • Fish oil
  • Animal Fats (including lard)

Less healthy oils:

  • Mayonnaise (check each label)
  • Vegetable Shortening
  • Canola oil
  • Peanut oil
  • Sesame oil

 

Organic Coconut Oil

Coconut oil is high in Medium Chain Triglycerides, or (MCT) fatty acids. These fats are metabolized differently. Coconut oil is used immediately for energy – not stored.

Organic Coconut Oil

Carrington farms organic coconut oil is gluten free, non-GMO, free of hydrogenated and trans fats, Kosher and zero carb.

High Performance MCT Oil

Left Coast’s pure MCT oil blend is easier to absorb and digest. MCT converts into energy faster than other oils, ignites your body’s metabolic rate and helps maintain healthy levels of cholesterol.

MCT oil is an easy way to increase your healthy fats. Add to salads, smoothies or Bulletproof coffee for immediate, all day energy.

bulletproof coffee best MCT Oil

Triple filtered, pharmaceutical grade, BPA-free container, USA-made, identical quality to the ‘Bulletproof’ brand.

 

Zero Carb Binders

Unflavored, powdered gelatin is a high protein, zero carb food. Gelatin strengthens hair and nails, helps skin stay elastic and helps with sleep.

Low carb guru, Dana Carpender has excellent ideas for adding gelatin:

Dana Carpender zero carb foods    “I intend to start adding gelatin to things, too. In particular, I plan to mix gelatin into ground meat dishes, from burgers to meat loaves to chili.

Why not? It’s flavorless. I’m betting in the burgers and meat loaves it holds moisture, and acts as a binder.

I’ve also started adding pork rind crumbs to a lot of ground meat recipes, not only for flavor, but for the gelatin.”

– from Hold The Toast “Gelatin Blowing My Mind”)

Use zero carb gelatin as a binder for ground meat, or add to lemonade for a filling, protein boost.

 

Zero Carb Beverages

These beverages are zero carb:

  • Water
  • Sparkling Water
  • Club Soda
  • Coffee
  • Tea
  • Diet Soda (watch the artificial sweetener)

 

Zero Carb Sweeteners

Companies advertise aspartame, sucralose, saccharine and stevia as no carb sugar substitutes. However – the powder and granular ones usually contain trace amounts of carbohydrate fillers.

It only takes a little to go a long way. Use a sprinkle.

Note: Artificial sweeteners can affect insulin the same way sugar does, so watch your progress, use sparingly and with caution.

 

Liquid Sucralose Sweetener

EZ-Sweetz liquid sweetener is made of sucralose and has no bitter aftertaste. Zero carb, zero calories, zero impact.

EzSweetz Soul Bread sucralose

 

Liquid De-Bittered Stevia

EZ-Sweetz’s de-bittered stevia blend has no unpleasant aftertaste. This blend has none of the characteristic bitterness of typical stevia sweeteners.

EZ-Sweetz Liquid De-Bittered Stevia

 

Zero Carb Alcohol

Use alcohol with caution. Your body burns alcohol before it burns fat for fuel. When you have metabolized all the alcohol, your body will return to burning fat.

Alcohol knocks some low carbers out of ketosis for several days after drinking alcohol. Everyone is different, so watch your progress and adjust if necessary.

  • Gin
  • Rum (unflavored)
  • Vodka (unflavored)
  • Whiskey
  • Tequila
  • Scotch

 

zero carb food greens cheese seeds

(Almost) Zero Carb Foods

This list of almost zero carb foods really expands your options without compromising your plan.

A single serving of these foods contains less than 1 net carb. Measure carefully and spread your extra carbs throughout the day.

 

Almost Zero Fruits and Veggies

Many of the leafy green vegetables (spinach, lettuce, celery, kale, turnip greens) are great choices for going zero carb.

Although commonly thought of as vegetables, avocados are fruit, almost zero carb and a source of healthy fat.

Raspberries are high in fiber and are great to sprinkle over a salad or top with whipped cream.

 

Serving size: 1/2 cup

  • Spinach .2
  • Parsley .4
  • Avocado .5
  • Radish .5
  • Lettuce .25
  • Bok Choy .7
  • Celery .8

Serving size: 1/4 cup

  • Mushrooms .5
  • Garlic (1/2 clove) .5
  • Pokeberry Shoots .5
  • Cabbage .5
  • Asparagus (3 pieces) .6
  • Coconut .5
  • Yellow Squash .7
  • Raspberries .7
  • Cauliflower .7
  • Broccoli .8
  • Cucumber .9

 

Almost Zero Eggs and Dairy

Eggs

Eggs are so versatile: fried, scrambled, omelets, quiche, boiled, deviled and of course – egg salad.

  • Eggs  .2 to .7 per egg (check the carton)

Eggs are almost zero carb, ranging from .2 to 1 net carb per egg. Organic, free-range, cage-free, etc. eggs have larger yolks, making them lower in carbs. Be sure to check each carton.

 

HWC

Most heavy whipping cream brands have less than 1 carb per tablespoon, even if the packaging declares “0 carbs.”

Check labels carefully – each brand of cream is very different.

  • Heavy Cream  .5 to .7 net carbs per tablespoon.
  • Half-and-Half  .5 to 1 net carb per tablespoon.

 

Almost Zero Cheese

Most natural, unprocessed cheeses (no added flavors or ingredients) are 0 to 1 net carb per serving. Hard cheeses will be the lowest; softer, creamy cheeses will be the highest.

The following cheeses and net carb amounts are from FatSecret, Popular Cheeses. When in doubt, check each label.

 

Serving size: 1 oz = 1″ cube = 1/4 cup grated (approx.)

  • Asiago .9
  • Blue .6
  • Brie .1
  • Camembert .1
  • Cheddar .3
  • Colby .7
  • Edam .4
  • Fontina .4
  • Goats .6
  • Gouda .6
  • Gruyère .1
  • Havarti .7
  • Mexican Blend Cheese .5
  • Monterey .1
  • Mozzarella .6
  • Muenster .3
  • Neufchatel .1 to .8
  • Parmesan .9
  • Provolone .6
  • Ricotta .8

* This list goes on and on… Be adventurous and try something new!

 

Printable No Carb Foods List

list of foods with no carbs

(Select image to view, print or save. Opens in a new window.)

 

4 Day No Carb Meal Plan

infographic 4 day zero carb meal plan menu recipes

Four days of zero carb snacks, mini meals, main dishes, desserts and drinks. Grab the 4 Day Zero Carb Meal planner and a free eBook, 12 Zero Carb Recipes.

source;http://lowcarbediem.com/

glutenfreebrownierecipe

The Best Paleo Brownies (Chocolaty Goodness)

Have I got a treat for you today. Delicious, fudge-like brownies that are not even bad for you! No sugar, no flour involved. Almond butter is what makes these brownies perfectly dense and chewy. They melt in your mouth when eaten warm right out of the oven. They are also amazing served with some Paleo ice cream, a classic combo. Ready in only 20 minutes, this recipe is easy to put together and sure to please your sweet tooth.

Gooey, Chocolaty Brownies- this is my favorite brownie recipe! I make these all the time and everyone loves them.

I have experimented with several Paleo brownie mixes but this one tops the list by far. They come out of the oven very moist and chewy. That means that if you are one of those people who likes the outside edge of brownies, you might want to bake them for a few extra minutes. I mean, there are even specially designed pans dedicated to making edge-only brownies, so I know you are out there. Also, my boyfriend is one of those people. One way I knew that we were a good match was that he liked to eat the outer edge from the brownie pan and I preferred the fudgy center. Perfect.

These brownies are better than any mix from a box, and they avoid a large heaping of sugar and flour. There actually isn’t any flour in the recipe at all, even gluten-free flour. I don’t know if I would be able to tell the difference between this brownie recipe and its non-Paleo counterpart. I received compliments on them from a few lucky friends who I shared with, and not one of them knew they were eating Paleo brownies. This batch did not last long. They are easy to make and are ready in a jiffy. What are you waiting for? Go try it!

out of the oven
finished recipe
paleo brownies

Is Almond Butter Paleo-friendly?

I love this paleo-friendly organic Almond Butter from Thrive Market (which is like Costco online but for healthy products). Their almond butter is 35% off retail. (And Thrive sells many other of my favorite healthy Paleo products at 30-50% off normal prices!)

The Best Paleo Brownies (Gluten-Free & Grain-Free)
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Ingredients
  1. 1 cup paleo-friendly almond butter
  2. 1/3 cup maple syrup
  3. 1 egg
  4. 2 tbsp ghee
  5. 1 tsp vanilla
  6. 1/3 cup cocoa powder
  7. 1/2 tsp baking soda
Instructions
  1. Preheat the oven to 325 degrees F. In a large bowl, whisk together the almond butter, syrup, egg, ghee, and vanilla. Stir in the cocoa powder and baking soda.
  2. Pour the batter into a 9-inch baking pan. Bake for 20-23 minutes, until the brownie is done, but still soft in the middle.
Notes
  1. Servings: 6
  2. Difficulty: Easy

source;http://paleogrubs.com/

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Weight Loss and 3 Main Effects of Carb Restriction

Weight loss & 3 Effects of Ketosis

 

 

The ketogenic diet is not only a great weight loss tool, but it has been shown to improve many health conditions. It’s any diet that causes ketones to be produced by the liver, shifting the body’s metabolism away from glucose and towards fat utilisation. The keto diet is an effective weight loss tool, but it doesn’t guarantee instant weight loss. It helps you reach your healthy goals in an easier way. There are three main effects of low-carb diets, including keto diets…

Three Main Effects of Low-Carb Diets:

Satiety Effect = No Hunger Issues

Firstly, you eat very sating and nutritious food that makes you less hungry and less likely to experience cravings. It’s a fact that people naturally eat less on a low-carb diet. Protein and fat are the most sating macronutrients by far. Achieving satiety and natural appetite control are the most important effects of low-carb eating. Insulin, which is a hormone released when you eat carbs, affects your appetite and with more carbs, you’ll experience more cravings. Also see Dr Briffa’s article: Contrary to what some may say, fruit and veg not great for filling us up.

Low-Carb Diets Are Better For Fat Loss

Secondly, eating fat helps your body release fat and lose weight, while carbohydrates have the opposite effect. This has to do with how insulin affects your body and as you already know, insulin is mostly produced when you eat carbs. The best results are achieved with coconut oil which is high in MCTs.

Potential Metabolic Advantage

Finally, there are studies that appear to support the idea of a potential “metabolic advantage” of low-carb diets. This means that you could achieve weight loss at a higher level than the calorie intake would suggest. When ketones are made from the breakdown of fat in the liver, urinary ketones are excreted and may contribute to fat loss. However, this effect is not significant and the energy lost as urinary ketones is no more than 100 kcal. For more about metabolic advantage of low-carb diets, check out this article: Is a Calorie Really a Calorie? Metabolic Advantage of Low-Carbohydrate DietsIn this study, participants following a low-carb diet experienced increased energy expenditure (by 300 kcal) compared to those following a low-fat diet. Although it didn’t result in a larger weight loss, it definitely questions the laws of energy balance.

source;http://ketodietapp.com/

golden-cauliflower-turmeric-flatbread

Nutritious Golden Cauliflower Turmeric Flatbread Recipe

golden cauliflower turmeric flatbread title card

This low-carb, veggie-packed Cauliflower Turmeric Flatbread is the perfect canvas for a healthy sandwich to grab and go. You can pack it with your favorite fillings and add it to your Paleo lunchbox!

Naturally gluten-free and full of fiber-rich ingredients, this Paleo flatbread is a healthy, easy meal to make. Vitamin C-rich cauliflower teamed with the amazing anti-inflammatory and immunity-boosting properties of turmeric turn it into a real “superfood.” Turmeric also gives this flatbread a lovely orange hue. With just four ingredients, this recipe comes together in a matter of minutes and answers all your sandwich cravings (while still keeping it deliciously grain-free).

golden cauliflower flatbread sandwich
The almond meal packs an excellent source of vitamin E, protein and dietary fiber to help keep your digestive system in good shape.

This cauliflower flatbread makes for the perfect low-carb, veggie-fueled lunch with a spread of mashed avocado and sliced tomatoes. You can also enjoy it with homemade almond butter for an easy, sweet breakfast. The best part—once baked, you can slice and store it in the refrigerator for up to a week.

Total time:40 MINS
Serves:8 slices
Cook Time:30 mins
Prep Time:10 mins

Golden Cauliflower Turmeric Flatbread

Zoe Raissakis
This low-carb, veggie-packed flatbread is loaded with turmeric and the perfect canvas for a healthy sandwich to grab and go.

Ingredients

  • 2 cups raw riced cauliflower
  • 4 eggs
  • 1 cup almond meal
  • 3 t turmeric powder
  • ½ t sea salt

Instructions

  • Preheat oven to 350°F. Line a baking tray with parchment paper.
  • In a medium bowl, mix all ingredients and combine well with a spoon.
  • Transfer mixture to the lined baking tray and evenly press it into a rectangle. Make sure the layer is about ½-centimeter thick.
  • Bake at 350°F for 30 minutes, or until golden.
  • Once baked, cool completely and gently peel the parchment paper from the flatbread.
  • Slice flatbread into 8 pieces.
  • Store bread in a container in the refrigerator for up to one week.

Pro Tip: You can swap the almond meal for any kind of seed-based meal, and make it nut-free.

golden cauliflower turmeric flatbread pin
source;http://blog.paleohacks.com/

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Paleo Sardine Stuffed Avocado-This recipe includes three super foods: avocado, turmeric and sardines.

Paleo Stuffed Avocado

Stuffed avocados are quick to prepare, sating and low in carbs. I use all kinds of different fillings and this one is my favourite!

This recipe includes three super foods: avocado, turmeric and sardines.

Including avocado in your diet is the best way to boost your electrolyte intake without taking supplements. An average avocado has less than 4 grams of net carbs, is very high in fibre, healthy monounsaturated fats and contains 50% EMR potassium.

Mark Sisson has an informative article about the numerous health effects of turmeric, including reduced inflammation, the real cause of heart disease.

Finally, sardines are high in healthy omega 3 fatty acids and low in mercury. If possible, get sardines in a glass jar or BPA-free tin.

 

Preparation time

Overall

Nutritional values (per serving):

Total Carbs 19.5 grams
Fiber 14 grams
Net Carbs 5.5 grams
Protein 27.2 grams
Fat 52.6 grams
of which Saturated 7.5 grams
Energy (calories) 633 kcal
Magnesium 100 mg (25% RDA)
Potassium 1410 mg (70% EMR)

Macronutrient ratio: Calories from carbs (4%), protein (18%), fat (78%)

Paleo Stuffed Avocado

Ingredients (1 serving):

  • 1 large avocado, seed removed (200g / 7.1 oz)
  • 1 tin sardines, drained (90g / 3.2 oz)
  • 1 tbsp mayonnaise, try my home-made mayo (15g / 0.5 oz)
  • 1 medium spring onion or bunch chives (15g / 0.5 oz)
  • 1 tbsp fresh lemon juice
  • ¼ tsp turmeric powder or 1 tsp freshly ground turmeric root (preferred)
  • ¼ tsp salt (I used pink Himalayan)

Notes: When looking for ingredients, try to get them in their most natural form (organic, without unnecessary additives).

Instructions:

  1. Halve the avocado and remove the seed. Drain the sardines and place them in a bowl.
    Paleo Stuffed Avocado
  2. Scoop the middle of the avocado out leaving ½ – 1 inch of the avocado flesh. Add finely sliced spring onion (or chives) and freshly grated turmeric root (or dried turmeric powder). Add mayonnaise and mix in well.
    Paleo Stuffed Avocado
  3. Add the scooped avocado flesh and mash into desired consistency. Squeeze in fresh lemon juice and season with salt.
    Paleo Stuffed Avocado
  4. Scoop the avocado mixture into each avocado half and enjoy!
    Paleo Stuffed Avocado

SOURCE;http://ketodietapp.com/

weekoneketomenuplan2-500x667

World Best Week One Keto/Low Carb 7 Day Meal Plan & Progress 2017

OK, can I just be honest and say that this 7 day keto menu plan thingy is a lot harder than I thought it would be????  (If you have no idea what I’m talking about, you can get caught up by reading the 3 day keto kickstart post.)  I’m sure it’s just my inexperience, and it will get easier after the learning curve, but keeping the carbs below 20g, making it budget friendly, not too much time spent cooking, finding ways to repurpose leftovers, etc. takes time!

This first version will be in list format, because I just didn’t have time yet to figure out other options. In the future it will either be in table format with links, in a downloadable pdf, something more user friendly than this. But this is what I’ve got this week, since I only had 2 days to figure it out so far!

If you want to print it I suggest cutting and pasting into a word document for now. Future low carb menu plans will hopefully be more user friendly (and will be posted every Saturday.)

7 day menu plan for keto or atkins diet by mellissa sevigny of I breathe I'm hungry

I kept the calories around 1600 per day give or take, and the carbs below 20g (obviously). I also posted daily nutrition totals, and also nutrition info for each item. That way, if you need to make substitutions you can figure out how it will affect your daily stats, and still keep it under 20g net carbs. You may find that you don’t need nearly as much food as this plan calls for – adjust portions and snacks to meet your own needs.

Speaking of substitutions it’s time for some tough love. Hate avocados? Substitute almonds. Allergic to nuts? Eat string cheese. Whether you use these menu plans as a general guideline or follow them to the letter (or not at all), that’s completely up to you.

PLEASE do not email me asking me how many carbs it would add to your day if you substitute one snack or meal from another day on the plan. That’s why I took the time to put the nutrition info on each item, so you can figure that out on your own. You may have to do some math for your own substitutions – don’t ask me to do it for you or I will get cranky.

There are literally thousands of you, each with your own personal dietary, time, and budget requirements, so it’s just not possible for me to make the perfect menu for your ideal circumstances each week.  I’m doing my best to make the menu plans easy to follow, not break the bank time or money-wise, and hopefully be delicious and satisfying – so please try to be flexible and reasonable with your expectations each week.

For example, if you hate cauliflower, please don’t email me to ask me if I have any other suggestions for you on that particular day. Ain’t nobody (specifically me) got time for that. I don’t mean to sound harsh, but I just can’t hold your hand through every single decision you’ll need to make on what to eat each day. I have a hard enough time managing my own!

And for the love of all that is decent, NEVER, EVER email me telling me that your keto calculator says that you need to eat 141.7 calories and 9.2g fat more than my menu for the day calls for – and then ask me what you should eat! I CANNOT BE HELD RESPONSIBLE FOR THE SNARKY RESPONSE THAT WILL PROBABLY SHOW UP IN YOUR INBOX AS A RESULT.  (I don’t like it when my voice sounds like this.)  🙅 😡 🙊

It’s time to educate yourself and put yer thinking caps on if you haven’t already. I very much want you to succeed (really I do!) and I’m here to help, but there’s a limit to how much time I can spend on this.  That being said, if you have legitimate questions, requests, or suggestions for future menu plans (too much variety/cooking, not enough? etc.) and how to improve them – please DO feel free to leave them in the comments!  And if you spot an error somewhere please do let me know so I can fix it!!!!

Also in the comments, please keep us posted each week as to how you are doing – feeling great? Miserable? Lost a ton of weight? None? WE WANT TO HEAR ABOUT IT! I’m hoping that we can congratulate or console each other on our amazing progress (or lack thereof) each week. In fact I’m really looking forward to that part!!!

Finally, as a reminder, if you haven’t gotten your ketostix yet, you should order some or run out to your Walmart or Pharmacy – they aren’t expensive and it’s nice to have validation that you are in ketosis once you get started!

Ok, next I’m posting the menu plan, below that you will find a shopping list, and finally notes on suggested prep.

Week One 7 Day Keto Menu Plan

Day One

(Totals: 1650 calories, 132g fat, 14g net carbs, 88g protein)

Breakfast:

3 inch square, Sausage & Spinach Frittata (206 calories, 16g fat, 1g net carbs, 12g protein)
Coffee with 2 Tbsp Heavy Cream (120 calories, 12g fat, 1g net carbs, 0g protein)

Snack

1/2 hass avocado w/ lite salt and pepper (114 calories, 11g fat, 1 g net carbs, 1g protein)

Lunch

1/2 cup Simple Egg Salad (166 calories, 14g fat, 1g net carbs, 10g protein)
4 Romaine Lettuce Leaves (4 calories, 0g fat, 0g net carbs, 0g protein)
2 slices cooked bacon (92 calories, 7g fat, 0g net carbs, 6g protein)

 

Keto Egg Salad from Mellissa Sevigny at I Breathe I'm Hungry

 

Snack

24 raw almonds (166 calories, 15g fat, 2g net carbs, 6g protein)

Dinner

6 oz rotisserie chicken (276 calories, 11g fat, 0g net carbs, 42g protein)
3/4 cup Easy Cauliflower Gratin (215 calories, 19g fat, 2g net carbs, 6g protein)
2 cups chopped romaine lettuce (16 calories, 0g fat, 1g net carbs, 1g protein)
2 Tbsp Caesar Salad Dressing (sugar free) (170 calories, 18g fat, 2g net carbs, 1g protein)

 

low carb cauliflower gratin

Dessert

2 squares Lindt 90% Chocolate (105 calories, 9g fat, 3g net carbs, 3g protein)

Day Two

(Totals: 1636 calories, 126g fat, 18.5g net carbs, 88g protein)

Breakfast:

3 inch square, Sausage & Spinach Frittata (206 calories, 16g fat, 1g net carbs, 12g protein)
Coffee with 2 Tbsp Heavy Cream (120 calories, 12g fat, 1g net carbs, 0g protein)

 

Snack

5 sticks of celery with 2 Tbsp Almond Butter (200 calories, 16g fat, 2.5g net carbs, 7g protein)

Lunch

2 cups chopped romaine lettuce (16 calories, 0g fat, 1g net carbs, 1g protein)
2 Tbsp Caesar Salad Dressing (sugar free) (170 calories, 18g fat, 2g net carbs, 1g protein)
1 cup chopped leftover chicken (276 calories, 11g fat, 0g net carbs, 42g protein)

Snack

1/2 hass avocado w/ lite salt and pepper (114 calories, 11g fat, 1 g net carbs, 1g protein)

Dinner

1 italian sausage link, cooked and sliced (230 calories, 18g fat, 1g net carbs, 13g protein)
1 cup cooked broccoli (55 calories, 0g fat, 6g net carbs, 4g protein)
1 Tbsp butter (102 calories, 12g fat, 0g net carbs, 0g protein)
2 Tbsp grated parmesan cheese (42 calories, 3g fat, 0g net carbs, 4g protein)

Dessert

2 squares Lindt 90% Chocolate (105 calories, 9g fat, 3g net carbs, 3g protein)

Day Three

(Totals: 1512 calories, 119g fat, 18g net carbs, 78g protein)

Breakfast:

2 Cream Cheese Pancakes (172 calories, 14g fat, 1g net carbs, 8g protein)
2 pcs cooked bacon (92 calories, 7g fat, 0g net carbs, 6g protein)
Coffee with 2 Tbsp Heavy Cream (120 calories, 12g fat, 1g net carbs, 0g protein)

Snack

2 String Cheese (160 calories, 12g fat, 2g net carbs, 16g protein)

Lunch

1 italian sausage link, cooked and sliced (230 calories, 18g fat, 1g net carbs, 13g protein)
3/4 cup Easy Cauliflower Gratin (215 calories, 19g fat, 2g net carbs, 6g protein)

Snack

1 cup bone broth (50 calories, 1g fat, 0g net carbs, 1g protein)

Dinner

1 1/2 cup Chili Spaghetti Squash Casserole (284 calories, 20g fat, 6g net carbs, 23g protein)
2 cups raw baby spinach (14 calories, 0g fat, 1g net carbs, 2g protein)
1 Tbsp ranch dressing (sugar free) (70 calories, 7g fat, 1g net carbs, 0g protein)

low carb and gluten free casserole recipe from ibreatheimhungry.com

Dessert

2 squares Lindt 90% Chocolate (105 calories, 9g fat, 3g net carbs, 3g protein)

Day Four

(Totals: 1386 calories, 112g fat, 19.5g net carbs, 69g protein)

Breakfast:

3 inch square, Sausage & Spinach Frittata (206 calories, 16g fat, 1g net carbs, 12g protein)
Coffee with 2 Tbsp Heavy Cream (120 calories, 12g fat, 1g net carbs, 0g protein)

Snack

1/2 hass avocado w/ lite salt and pepper (114 calories, 11g fat, 1 g net carbs, 1g protein)

Lunch

1 1/2 cup Chili Spaghetti Squash Casserole (284 calories, 20g fat, 6g net carbs, 23g protein)

Snack

1 cup bone broth (50 calories, 1g fat, 0g net carbs, 1g protein)

Dinner

1/2 cup “Anti” Pasta Salad (102 calories, 8g fat, 4g net carbs, 3g protein)
4 Sundried Tomato & Feta Meatballs (356 calories, 32g fat, 2.5g net carbs, 24g protein)
2 cups raw baby spinach (14 calories, 0g fat, 1g net carbs, 2g protein)
1 Tbsp italian dressing (sugar free) (35 calories, 3g fat, 0g net carbs, 0g protein)

 

Sun dried Tomato & Feta Meatballs

Dessert

2 squares Lindt 90% Chocolate (105 calories, 9g fat, 3g net carbs, 3g protein)

Day Five

(Totals: 1649 calories, 132g fat, 18.5g net carbs, 81g protein)

Breakfast:

2 Cream Cheese Pancakes (172 calories, 14g fat, 1g net carbs, 8g protein)
2 pcs cooked bacon (92 calories, 7g fat, 0g net carbs, 6g protein)
Coffee with 2 Tbsp Heavy Cream (120 calories, 12g fat, 1g net carbs, 0g protein)

Snack

1 cup bone broth (50 calories, 1g fat, 0g net carbs, 1g protein)

Lunch

1/2 cup “Anti” Pasta Salad (102 calories, 8g fat, 4g net carbs, 3g protein)
4 Sundried Tomato & Feta Meatballs (356 calories, 32g fat, 2.5g net carbs, 24g protein)

pastalesssalad2small

Snack

5 sticks of celery with 2 Tbsp Almond Butter (200 calories, 16g fat, 2.5g net carbs, 7g protein)

Dinner

1 cup Cuban Pot Roast (taco salad style) (271 calories, 19g fat, 2g net carbs, 20g protein)
2 cups chopped romaine lettuce (16 calories, 0g fat, 1g net carbs, 1g protein)
2 Tbsp sour cream (51 calories, 5g fat, 1g net carbs, 1g protein)
1 Tbsp chopped cilantro (optional)
1/4 cup shredded cheddar cheese (114 calories, 9g fat, .5g net carbs, 7g protein)

Dessert

2 squares Lindt 90% Chocolate (105 calories, 9g fat, 3g net carbs, 3g protein)

Day Six

(Totals: 1604 calories, 122g fat, 19.5g net carbs, 89g protein)

Breakfast:

3 eggs (scrambled or fried) (215 calories, 14g fat, 1g net carbs, 19g protein)
1 tsp butter (36 calories, 4g fat, 0g net carbs, 0g protein)
2 pcs cooked bacon (92 calories, 7g fat, 0g net carbs, 6g protein)
Coffee with 2 Tbsp Heavy Cream (120 calories, 12g fat, 1g net carbs, 0g protein)

Snack

24 raw almonds (166 calories, 15g fat, 2g net carbs, 6g protein)

Lunch

1 cup Cuban Pot Roast (taco salad style) (271 calories, 19g fat, 2g net carbs, 20g protein)
2 cups chopped romaine lettuce (16 calories, 0g fat, 1g net carbs, 1g protein)
2 Tbsp sour cream (51 calories, 5g fat, 1g net carbs, 1g protein)
1 Tbsp chopped cilantro (optional)
1/4 cup shredded cheddar cheese (114 calories, 9g fat, .5g net carbs, 7g protein)

low carb ropa vieja recipe from ibreatheimhungry.com

Snack

1 cup bone broth (50 calories, 1g fat, 0g net carbs, 1g protein)

Dinner

1 1/2 cup Chili Spaghetti Squash Casserole (284 calories, 20g fat, 6g net carbs, 23g protein)
2 cups raw baby spinach (14 calories, 0g fat, 1g net carbs, 2g protein)
1 Tbsp ranch dressing (sugar free) (70 calories, 7g fat, 1g net carbs, 0g protein)

Dessert

2 squares Lindt 90% Chocolate (105 calories, 9g fat, 3g net carbs, 3g protein)

Day Seven

(Totals: 1609 calories, 128g fat, 18g net carbs, 90g protein)

Breakfast:

2 Cream Cheese Pancakes (172 calories, 14g fat, 1g net carbs, 8g protein)
2 pcs cooked bacon (92 calories, 7g fat, 0g net carbs, 6g protein)
Coffee with 2 Tbsp Heavy Cream (120 calories, 12g fat, 1g net carbs, 0g protein)

Snack

2 String Cheese (160 calories, 12g fat, 2g net carbs, 16g protein)

Lunch

1/2 cup “Anti” Pasta Salad (102 calories, 8g fat, 4g net carbs, 3g protein)
4 Sundried Tomato & Feta Meatballs (356 calories, 32g fat, 2.5g net carbs, 24g protein)

Snack

1 cup bone broth (50 calories, 1g fat, 0g net carbs, 1g protein)

Dinner

1 cup Cuban Pot Roast (taco salad style) (271 calories, 19g fat, 2g net carbs, 20g protein)
2 cups chopped romaine lettuce (16 calories, 0g fat, 1g net carbs, 1g protein)
2 Tbsp sour cream (51 calories, 5g fat, 1g net carbs, 1g protein)
1 Tbsp chopped cilantro (optional)
1/4 cup shredded cheddar cheese (114 calories, 9g fat, .5g net carbs, 7g protein)

Dessert

2 squares Lindt 90% Chocolate (105 calories, 9g fat, 3g net carbs, 3g protein)


Pantry and Shopping List

Note: You may find that you need to make a lot of purchases this week for the pantry and shopping list. Please be assured though that future weeks menu plans will be created with those in mind and will make use of them.

Check your Pantry for…

ground cumin
ground coriander
garlic powder
onion powder
dried oregano
ground cinnamon
ground nutmeg
sugar free sweetener of choice (splenda, stevia, swerve, etc.)
dried onion flakes
apple cider vinegar
sugar free italian dressing
sugar free ranch dressing
sugar free caesar dressing
sugar free almond butter
raw almonds
dijon mustard
mayonnaise (sugar free)
lemon juice
sundried tomatoes (dry or in oil)
kalamata olives, pitted
fresh garlic cloves
balsamic vinegar
extra virgin olive oil
dried thyme
almond flour
canned chipotles in adobo sauce

Shopping list

Produce

2 fresh tomatoes
1 red or yellow bell pepper
2 packages romaine lettuce hearts
1 8oz package/bag baby spinach leaves (6 cups or more)
2 hass avocados
1 bunch of celery
2 heads cauliflower (or 6 cups total frozen florets)
1 large spaghetti squash
1 small head raddichio
1 bunch fresh basil

Dairy

8oz sour cream
16oz cheddar cheese
8 oz cream cheese
3 dozen eggs
4 oz feta cheese
1/2 gallon unsweetened almond milk
16oz heavy cream
8oz package of string cheese
8oz package pepper jack cheese slices
1/2 lb salted butter
4 oz parmesan cheese, grated

Grocery

8 oz jar salsa verde
4 oz canned chopped green chilis
2 bars lindt 90% chocolate
lite salt (half potassium half sodium)
1 can artichoke hearts in water
8 oz jar tomato based salsa (sugar free)

Meat

2.5 – 3 lb boneless chuck roast
12oz roll of breakfast sausage (sugar free)
1 rotisserie chicken (or bake your own)
1lb package italian pork sausage links
1lb ground turkey
1lb ground beef
1lb sugar free bacon

Frozen

10 oz package frozen spinach
10 oz package frozen broccoli florets

Prep List

Notes: Depending on your schedule you may find it easier to make everything on the weekend and reheat throughout the week – all of these dishes reheat well in that case. Otherwise you may choose to make some of the dishes on the weekend and others as needed throughout the week – that’s totally up to you.

  1. Remove all the meat from your rotisserie chicken and place in a container for later. Boil the chicken carcass with peppercorns and about a gallon of water and simmer for 4 hours (or longer) to make your bone broth. You may have to add a little more water as it reduces. You should end up with 5 – 6 cups of concentrated broth after you strain out the solids. Add salt and lite salt (for potassium) at the end to your preference. Store in the fridge for the week or freeze.
  2. Assemble and bake your Sausage, Spinach & Feta Frittata and cut into four inch squares for the week. Extra portions can be frozen.
  3. Make ahead your Easy Cauliflower Gratin and refrigerate. Extra portions can be frozen.
  4. Assemble and bake your Chili Spaghetti Squash Casserole and refrigerate. Extra portions can be frozen.
  5. Make 2 batches of the Cream Cheese Pancakes and refrigerate. Heat for 30 seconds in the microwave if desired.
  6. Cook the entire pound of bacon and store in the fridge until needed. Microwave about 20 seconds before eating.
  7. Assemble Anti Pasta Salad and divide into 1/2 cup portions. Meant to be eaten cold or at room temp.
  8. Assemble and cook the Sundried Tomato and Feta Meatballs. (DON’T EAT THEM ALL) Extra portions may be frozen.
  9. Cook the Cuban Pot Roast and set aside portions for the week. Freeze the extra portions.

So there you have it. Week One down. I know it’s clunky but I’ll work on making it more user friendly next week. Looking forward to how you’re doing so far! I know some of you haven’t started yet, so I’ll look forward to hearing about your progress next week!

I started on Thursday and so far I’m down 2 lbs and solidly in ketosis, and it only took a day and a half! This is why I love ketostix and being able to easily verify ketosis whenever I want to – it’s a great motivator when you’re just starting out.

Still having headaches but much less than I anticipated which is a nice bonus! I’ve been drinking TONS of water and I think that’s helping with the detox so far. Hopefully I’ll have some significant progress to report by Saturday! Have a great week!!!

source;http://www.ibreatheimhungry.com/

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THE TRUTH ABOUT FAT AND SUGAR IS FINALLY EXPLAINED-diet program

Why did it take us so long to realise sugar, not fat, was the enemy? In a move that would make most big pharma companies proud, new research published in JAMA Internal Medicine found sugar companies paid to downplay the white stuff’s role in heart disease during the 1960s. Scary stuff, even more so because it’s had lasting effects on public perceptions. It’s time everyone woke up to the truth about fat and sugar. MH investigates…

This morning, as I do most days, I breakfasted on a three egg omelette cooked in coconut oil, with a whole milk coffee. I enjoyed a wedge of full fat cheese with my lunch, poured a liberal dose of olive oil on my evening salad and snacked on nuts throughout the day. In short, I ingested a fair amount of fat and, as a cardiologist who has treated thousands of people with heart disease, this may seem a particularly peculiar way to behave. Fat, after all, furs up our arteries and piles on the pounds – or at least that’s what prevailing medical and dietary advice has had us believe. As a result, most of us have spent years eschewing full fat foods for their ‘low fat’ equivalents, in the hope it will leave us fitter and healthier.

Yet I’m now convinced we have instead been doing untold damage: far from being the best thing for health or weight loss, a low fat diet is the opposite. In fact, I would go so far as to say the change in dietary advice in 1977 to restrict the amount of fat we were eating helped to fuel the obesity epidemic unfolding today. It’s a bold statement, but one I believe is upheld by an array of recent research.

These days I make a point of telling my patients – many of whom are coping with debilitating heart problems – to avoid anything bearing the label ‘low fat’. Better instead, I tell them, to embrace full fat dairy and other saturated fats within the context of a healthy eating plan. It’s an instruction that is sometimes greeted with open-mouthed astonishment, along with my request to steer clear of anything that promises to reduce cholesterol – another of those edicts we are told can promote optimum heart and artery health.

As we will see, the reality is far more nuanced: in some cases lowering cholesterol levels can actually increase cardiovascular death and mortality, while in healthy people over sixty a higher cholesterol is associated with a lower risk of mortality. Why, exactly, we will come to later.

First though, let me make it clear that until very recently, I too assumed that keeping fat to a minimum was the key to keeping healthy and trim. In fact, to say my diet revolved around carbohydrates is probably an understatement: sugared cereal, toast and orange juice for breakfast, a panini for lunch and pasta for dinner was not an uncommon daily menu. Good solid fuel, or so I thought, especially as I am a keen sportsman and runner. Still, I had a wedge of fat round my stomach which no amount of football and running seemed to shift.

That, though, wasn’t the reason I started to explore changing what I ate. That process started in 2012, when I read a paper called ‘The toxic truth about Sugar’ by Robert Lustig in the science journal Nature.  In it, Lustig, a Professor of Paediatrics who also works at the University of California’s Centre for Obesity Assessment, said that the dangers to human health caused by added sugar were such that products packed with it should carry the same warnings as alcohol. It was an eye-opener: as a doctor I already knew too much of anything is bad for you, but here was someone telling us that something most of us ate unthinkingly every day was, slowly, killing us.

The more I looked into it, the more it became abundantly clear to me that it was sugar, not fat, which was causing so many of our problems – which is why, along with a group of fellow medical specialists I launched the lobbying group Action on Sugar last year with the aim of persuading the food industry to reduce added sugar in processed foods.

Then earlier this year I had another light-bulb moment. In February Karen Thomson, the granddaughter of pioneering heart transplant surgeon Christian Barnard, and Timothy Noakes, a highly-respected Professor of Exercise and Sports Medicine at the University of Cape Town, invited me to speak at the world’s first ‘low carb’ summit in South Africa. I was intrigued, particularly as the conference hosts are both fascinating characters. A former model, Thomson has courageously battled a number of addictions including alcohol and cocaine, but lately it is another powder – one she labels ‘pure, white and deadly’ – that has resulted in her opening the world’s first carbohydrate and sugar addiction rehab clinic in Cape Town.

Noakes, meanwhile, has recently performed a remarkable U-turn on the very dietary advice he himself expounded for most of his illustrious career: that is, that athletes need to load up on carbohydrates to enhance performance. A marathon runner, he was considered the poster boy for high carbohydrate diets for athletes – then he developed Type 2 diabetes. Effectively tearing pages out of his own textbook, Noakes has now said athletes – and this goes for those of us who like to jog around the park too – can get their energy from ketones, not glucose. That is, from fat not sugar.

Alongside them were fifteen international speakers ranging from doctors, academics and health campaigners who between them produced an eloquent and evidence-based demolition of “low fat” thinking – as well as suggesting that it is carbohydrate consumption, not fatty foods, which is fuelling our obesity epidemic.

Opening the conference was Gary Taubes, a former Harvard physicist who wrote The Diet Delusion, in which he argued that it is refined carbohydrates that are responsible for heart disease, diabetes, obesity, cancer, and many other of our Western maladies. The book caused controversy when it was released seven years ago, but his message is finally gaining traction. And that message is this: obesity is not about how many calories we eat, but what we eat. Refined carbohydrates fuel the over production of insulin, which in turn promotes fat storage. In other words: it’s not calories from fat themselves that are the problem.

It’s a robust message that was reinforced time and again at the conference. Take Swedish family physician Dr Andreas Eenfeldt, In his home country, studies show that up to twenty three percent of the population are embracing a high fat, low carbohydrate diet. A ticking time bomb you might think – but contrary to expectations, while obesity rates are soaring everywhere else, they are now starting to show a decline there.

More research on this correlation is yet to be done – but in the meantime The Swedish Council on Health Technology has made its position clear. After a two year review involving sixteen scientists, it concluded that a high fat, low carb diet may not only be best for weight loss, but also for reducing several markers of cardiovascular risk in the obese. In short, as Dr Eenfeldt told the conference, ‘You don’t get fat from eating fatty foods just as you don’t turn green from eating green vegetables.’

This, of course, is a difficult message for many to swallow; particularly for heart patients, most of whom have spent years pursuing a low fat, low cholesterol diet as the best way to preserve heart health.

It’s a public health message that was first promoted in the sixties, after the globally respected Framingham Heart study sanctified high cholesterol as a major risk factor for heart disease. It’s a cornerstone of government and public health messages – yet what people didn’t know was that the study also threw up some more complex statistics. Like this one: for every 1mg/dl per year drop in cholesterol levels in those who took part in the study there was a 14% increase in cardiovascular death and an 11% increase in mortality in the following 18 years for those aged over 50.

It’s not the only statistic that doesn’t sit with the prevailing anti-cholesterol message: in 2013, a group of academics studied previously unpublished data from a seminal study done in the early seventies, known as the Sydney Diet Heart study. They discovered that cardiac patients who replaced butter with margarine had an increased mortality, despite a 13% reduction in total cholesterol. And the Honolulu heart study published in the Lancet in 2001 concluded that in the over-sixties a high total cholesterol is inversely associated with risk of death. Startling, isn’t it? A lower cholesterol is not in itself the mark of success, it only works in parallel with other important markers, like a shrinking waist size and diminishing blood markers for diabetes.

Conversely, a mounting slew of evidence suggests that far from contributing to heart problems, having full fat dairy in your diet may actually protect you from heart disease and type 2 diabetes. What most people fail to understand is that, when it comes to diet, it’s the polyphenols and omega 3 fatty acids abundant in extra virgin olive oil, nuts, fatty fish and vegetables that help to rapidly reduce thrombosis and inflammation independent of changes in cholesterol. Yet full fat dairy has remained demonized – until now.

In 2014, two Cambridge Medical Research Council studies concluded that the saturated fats in the blood stream that came from dairy products were inversely associated with Type 2 diabetes and heart disease. Meaning that in moderate amounts – no-one is talking about devouring a cheese board in one sitting here – cheese is actually a proponent of good health and longevity. The same study, incidentally, found that the consumption of starch, sugar and alcohol encourages the production of fatty acids made by the liver that correlate with an increased risk of these killer diseases.

It is around type 2 Diabetes, in fact, that the anti-fat pro-carb message of recent decades has done some of the greatest damage. A lot of patients suffering from Type 2 Diabetes – the most common kind – are laboring under the dangerous misapprehension that a low fat, starchy carbohydrate fuelled diet will help their medication work most effectively. They couldn’t be more wrong. Earlier this year, a critical review in the respected journal Nutrition concluded that dietary carbohydrate restriction is one of the most effective interventions for reducing features of metabolic syndrome.

It would be better to rename type 2 diabetes “carbohydrate intolerance disease”. Try telling this to the public though. Like the man who called into a national radio show in Cape Town on which I was taking part to discuss the relationship between diet and heart disease. Diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes, he was under the impression he had to consume sugar so his diabetes medications could ‘work’ – when in fact it was going to worsen his symptoms. And how many doctors and patients know that although some of these medications to control blood sugar may marginally reduce the risk of developing kidney disease, eye disease and neuropathy, they don’t actually have any impact on heart attack, stroke risk or reduce death rates? On the contrary dangerously low blood sugar from overmedicating on diabetes drugs has been responsible for approximately 100,000 emergency room visits per year in the United States.

But who can blame the public for such misguided perceptions? In my opinion a perfect storm of biased research funding, biased reporting in the media and commercial conflicts of interest have contributed to an epidemic of misinformed doctors and misinformed patients. The result is a nation of over-medicated sugar addicts who are eating and pill-popping their way to years of misery with chronic debilitating diseases and an early grave.

It’s why, these days, I very seldom touch bread, have got rid of all added sugars and have embraced full fat as part of my varied Mediterranean-inspired diet. I feel better, have more energy and – even though I didn’t set out to do so – I’ve lost that fatty tyre around my waist, despite reducing the time I spend exercising.

Perhaps you can’t face making all those changes in one go. In which case, if you do one thing, make it this: next time you are in the supermarket and are tempted to pick up a pack of low-fat spread, buy a pack of butter instead or, better still, a bottle of extra virgin olive oil. Your heart will thank you for it. The father of modern medicine Hippocrates once said, “let food be thy medicine and medicine be thy food”. It’s now time we let “fat” be that medicine.

Dr Aseem Malhotra is a cardiologist, founding member of the Public Health Collaboration and advisor to the National Obesity Forum. 

source;http://www.menshealth.co.uk/

pumpkinmuffins_6776_1_1

THE BEST LOW-CARB PUMPKIN SPICE MUFFINS (DAIRY-FREE)

The Best Low-Carb Pumpkin Spice Muffins | Low-Carb, So Simple!

I wouldn’t wonder if these muffins are the best ever low-carb pumpkin muffins you’ve tasted. And definitely the simplest and easiest to make! They are soft, moist and incredibly yummy.

I’ve developed, tested and fine-tuned this recipe until perfection. I have gone to great pains (well, honestly it was all fun…) to develop this recipe and find the best ingredients and the best ratios so that you can just grab the stuff, mix everything together and bake some amazingly delicious muffins!

TIPS FOR MAKING THE BEST LOW-CARB PUMPKIN SPICE MUFFINS

The batter is really easy to make and it’s ready in no time. It doesn’t need time-consuming beating or creaming of eggs and sweetener.

In the recipe directions I’ve recommended to mix the dry ingredients, so almond flour, pumpkin pie spice and erythritol first before adding the pumpkin and eggs. Often, when baking these muffins, I just put all the ingredients in a large bowl and then beat them with an electric mixer until well mixed and smooth. Sometimes, if there are big lumps of almond flour among the dry ingredients, I tend to break them first with my fingers before adding the pumpkin and eggs. Another way to get rid of lumps is of course sifting the almond flour first.

I’ve noticed no difference in the end result if I just put all the ingredients in a bowl and mix them at the same time, or if I first mix well the dry ingredients and then add the pumpkin and eggs. However, if you want to be absolutely sure that the batter is smooth and there are no lumps of any kind, it is as well to first mix properly the dry ingredients or sift the almond flour.

The muffin cups can be filled until they are almost full. Even the muffins rise in the oven, they usually don’t spill over.

I recommend to cover the muffins with a towel after removing the muffin pan from the oven. This guarantees the moistness and that the surface doesn’t get hard.

I prefer to bake 12 medium size muffins, but feel free to bake muffins of your preferred size. Please take into account that the baking time might vary depending on the size — for mini muffins the time is naturally shorter, and for large muffins longer.

The Best Low-Carb Pumpkin Spice Muffins (Dairy-Free)

Ingredients

Instructions

  1. 1. Preheat oven to 300 °F (150 °C).
  2. 2. Line a muffin pan with paper liners.
  3. 3. In a large bowl, combine the almond flour, pumpkin pie spice and erythritol and mix well until there are no lumps.
  4. 4. Add the pumpkin and eggs and beat with an electric mixer until smooth.
  5. 5. Scoop the batter into each muffin cup.
  6. 6. Bake for some 30–40 minutes, or until a stick inserted in the middle of the muffin comes out almost dry.
  7. 7. Remove the muffin pan from the oven and cover with a towel.
  8. 8. Let the muffins cool under the towel, remove the towel and the muffins from the pan and serve. For a really indulgent treat, frost the muffins with Quick Low-Carb Cream Cheese Frosting.
  9. 9. Store in an airtight container.

 

Nutrition information Protein Fat Net carbs kcal
In total: 67.9 g 106.2 g 26.3 g 1346 kcal
Per muffin if 6 muffins in total: 11.3 g 17.7 g 4.4 g 224 kcal
Per muffin if 8 muffins in total: 8.5 g 13.3 g 3.3 g 168 kcal
Per muffin if 10 muffins in total: 6.8 g 10.6 g 2.6 g 135 kcal
Per muffin if 12 muffins in total: 5.7 g 8.9 g 2.2 g 112 kcal
Per muffin if 16 muffins in total: 4.2 g 6.6 g 1.6 g 84 kcal
Per muffin if 20 muffins in total: 3.4 g 5.3 g 1.3 g 67 kcal
Per muffin if 24 muffins in total: 2.8 g 4.4 g 1.1 g 56 kcal

 

source;http://www.lowcarbsosimple.com/

microwave-caramel-sauce-5

5 Mint Low Carb Sugar-Free Microwave Salted Caramel Sauce

This easy microwave salted caramel sauce is sugar-free and low carb and made in under 5 minutes!

 

The beauty about any recipe that can be easily made in the microwave is the ability to skip a few extra minutes in front of a stove. In this case it would normally take between 20-30 minutes of stirring over a low heat to get this creamy caramel sauce texture. This recipe takes less than 5 minutes!

microwave-caramel-sauce-5

Now don’t get me wrong, I love making recipes and some recipes truly need hours to develop the best flavors. I’m not opposed to taking time with any recipe when it requires it. But some recipes can be just as good without the traditional length of time it usually takes.

 

I’m a busy mom of 3 and it’s Christmas time, I want the most bang for my buck so to speak for my time spent in the kitchen. Between Christmas shopping, homeschooling my kids, cooking constantly just to feed my family every day and blog work, I need some recipes to be fast! This caramel sauce is one of them! I’ve got a bunch of ideas for holiday treats using this luscious sauce so that’s why I’m sharing this quickie method.  You won’t be disappointed!

 

The other fabulous thing about this recipe is that everything gets poured together at once in a a mason jar, cooked in the jar and stored in the jar!

Less steps and less to clean up !

 

If you’re opposed to using a microwave directions are below for the traditional cooking method.

microwave-caramel-sauce-6

Don’t be fooled into thinking you did something wrong when your caramel sauce is finished and it looks like this! This recipe was about an hour after it was completed in the microwave. A deep amber color is what you are looking for so I knew it was perfect, and even the consistency was good, but I knew as it cooled it would change it color and it did as you can see from the rest of the photos which we taken the following day after it was made. It also thickened even more which is fantastic.

 

Brenda’s Notes:

  • There are natural sugars in the heavy cream that is why there is 1 gram in the nutrition info below. Sukrin fiber syrup is sugar free.
  • At this time I have not made any other substitutions for replacing the Sukrin fiber syrup.
  • I have another recipe for a Low Sugar Salted Caramel sauce which does not use the microwave.
  • TO MAKE ON STOVE: Melt the butter and Sukrin syrup in a pot over low heat. Once melted, stir in remaining ingredients and bring to a boil. Simmer for 15-30 minutes or until it starts to thicken and turn amber in color.
  • All microwaves are different in strength, be sure to place a plate or bowl under the mason jar in case of any spilling over.
  • Store this in the refrigerator then warm slightly when serving, maybe just 30 seconds to a minute in the microwave.
  • Sukrin Fiber Gold Syrup
Sugar-Free Microwave Salted Caramel Sauce
Nutrition Information
  • Serves: 12 ounces
  • Serving size: 1 ounce
  • Calories: 89
  • Fat: 6.3g
  • Saturated fat: 3.7mg
  • Carbohydrates: 1g
  • Sugar: 1g
  • Sodium: 126mg
  • Fiber: 0g
  • Protein: 0g
  • Cholesterol: 20mg
Prep time: 
Cook time: 
Total time: 
 
Ingredients
    • 4 tbsp butter
    • 6 ounces Sukrin Fiber Gold Syrup
    • 3 ounces heavy cream
    • 1/2 tsp coarse sea salt
    • 1 tsp vanilla extract

Instructions
  1. Place everything except sea salt and vanilla extract in a 12 ounce or larger mason jar.
  2. Microwave 1 minute. Stir.
  3. Microwave 1 minute. Stir well.
  4. Microwave 1 more minute, don’t stir, let it sit for 2 minutes.
  5. Check the color and consistency. If it still looks too loose and thin, microwave 1 more minute.
  6. Mine was perfect at 4 minutes.
  7. Stir in the seas salt and vanilla extract.
  8. Allow to cool completely on counter.
  9. As it cools it will change in color and thicken.
  10. Keep refrigerated.
 source;http://www.sugarfreemom.com/