How technology is reducing seizures in patients with epilepsy

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When 29-year-old Krystle Thrasher was diagnosed with epilepsy in 2011, she often had 10 to 15 seizures a month despite taking medication to help control her seizure activity.

“After a seizure, I would be tired and just want to go to bed,” said Thrasher, a paralegal who lives in Sunrise with her husband and 9-month-old son.

Epilepsy, the fourth most common neurological disorder, is defined by recurrent and unprovoked seizures. Seizure frequency varies depending on the type of seizure disorder, with some patients experiencing several seizures daily while others don’t have seizures for years at a time.

There are two principal types of seizure disorders. One, known as focal epilepsy, originates in a defined area of the brain. The second, generalized epilepsy, are seizures involving the entire brain, said Dr. Andres Kanner, professor of clinical neurology, chief of the epilepsy division and director of the Comprehensive Epilepsy Center at UHealth-University of Miami Health System.

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When 29-year-old Krystle Thrasher was diagnosed with epilepsy in 2011, she often had 10 to 15 seizures a month despite taking medication to help control her seizure activity.

“After a seizure, I would be tired and just want to go to bed,” said Thrasher, a paralegal who lives in Sunrise with her husband and 9-month-old son.

Epilepsy, the fourth most common neurological disorder, is defined by recurrent and unprovoked seizures. Seizure frequency varies depending on the type of seizure disorder, with some patients experiencing several seizures daily while others don’t have seizures for years at a time.

There are two principal types of seizure disorders. One, known as focal epilepsy, originates in a defined area of the brain. The second, generalized epilepsy, are seizures involving the entire brain, said Dr. Andres Kanner, professor of clinical neurology, chief of the epilepsy division and director of the Comprehensive Epilepsy Center at UHealth-University of Miami Health System.

source;http://www.miamiherald.com/

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